English cooking vocabulary

Discussion in 'Cooking' started by yodeli, Sep 1, 2015.

  1. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    A the end of this week , on Saturday to be precise, I will start giving cookery lessons ...BUT it'll all be explained in English AHA!

    Of course I do know already a few words (Stephen has been my main teacher @Stephen & Jeannie ) but I bet I will miss one or two at the wrong moment!!

    So I thought may be those who practice a lot could help with "which ever word " you think of

    When you fry , when you mix, when you have to wait , when making a sauce... which words come first to your mind?? Are there new words or is it still the same vocabulary you mum or granny used when you were a child?
    I will teach more "salted" dishes than sweet ones. Mind you at some point I'll have to teach the Crème Anglaise, and indeed I'd like to teach it the right way!

    I'm not afraid to learn hundred words or more.... Just tell me yours and I'll be happy!
    Thanks in advance for your input, I promise I'll make the best of it

    Amicalement

    Frankie:)

    PS : Yes I have English cooking books , but I do prefer to read what people usually say!
     
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  2. GeriatricWanderer

    GeriatricWanderer Funster

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    ...... and be sure not to get your conservatives mixed up with your preservatives. :)
     
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  3. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    sauce englais....gravy
     
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  4. jollyrodger

    jollyrodger Funster Life Member

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    Cooking
    Were brought up on bread and dripping :)
     
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  5. Chris

    Chris Funster Life Member

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    I hope JJ will be taking notes.

    It will be Fray Bentos pie in a red wine jus served with dauphonoise potatoes.(y)
     
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  6. WynandJean

    WynandJean Funster

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    I have to say I am very impressed by what you are prepared to take on. Good for you and bon chance.
     
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  7. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

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    Gosh, that is a wide ranging question. :)

    But I will have a go. Terms used for frying include "sweat" and "soften". For example if you add chopped onions to oil in a pan and gently heat them this is sometimes called to "sweat" them (where sweat rhymes with wet, not sweet). You could also say you are "softening" them. Other vegetable such as carrots can also be "sweated".

    The term used for the dishes you called "salted" is I think "savoury". Savoury dishes are things like main course - meat, fish etc, not puddings, which as you say are sweet. Sweet and savoury are the two main types of dish.

    Mixing might include words like "fold" where you add say beaten egg whites to a cake mixture. But if using a food processor then terms like "blitz" or "zap" might be used. If using a microwave (!) then "zap" could be used again or "nuke".
     
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  8. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    I've heard of that "dripping" thingy.... Can't remember having had some yet ! I have to pencil it of my "must do list"
    Is it something you can only have at home?
     
  9. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

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    You really don't want to go down the dripping route. Look at the size of the average English tourist in your country. It is a fat made from the bits of an animal they can't sell attached to meat. :)

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    dripping is the congealed meat juices and fat left after roasting beef

    I used to have to know the french for so many cooking terms as my mother, grandmother & sister were all chefs. come home and ask what's for dinner and you had to decypher the reply. the family were as always tasters for anything new on the menu and perfecting recipies

    there are some good resources on the internet for basic translations
    http://www.di.ens.fr/~cousot/sas01/english/dico.html
     
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  11. The Dude

    The Dude Funster

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    And if you have any Welsh students there then the microwave is called Popty Ping (love this expression :))
     
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  12. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    :mnythnks:

    This is exactly the kind of words I want to know.

    We use the same Sweat , is" faire suer" while soften would be more like "confire" which is a slow way to cook . The only difference is that "confire" will last longer!
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
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  13. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    Only French students, wanting to fully use their time...hence cooking AND English.
    While delicious things will be on gas ...they will have to entertain me with different subjects ... all in English ...
     
  14. jollyrodger

    jollyrodger Funster Life Member

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    And after the dripping came jeelie (?) Piece's :)
     
  15. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    Can you explain? must be something I never heard of.... "came jeelie? Piece's" ??? Ta!
     
  16. jollyrodger

    jollyrodger Funster Life Member

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    A , Jam " sarnie " (sand which) :D
    from Scottish vocabulary I understand
     
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  17. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

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    pork dripping is much nicer . on bread with a bit of salt mmm or on warm toast.
    although when i was younger and was a butcer ,i always ad to bring home fatty pork joints to have nice dripping . on Saturday nights sunday mornings our house used to be full of mates come round after a night in the pub to eat my mums pork dripping sarnies etc .
    seems their mum never ever had any .
     
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  18. jetlag03

    jetlag03 Funster

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    Certainly wouldn't want to mix them in France now would you .... one ends sticky the other a sticky end
     
  19. Langtoftlad

    Langtoftlad Funster Life Member

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    You're a brave lady trying to teach us "Ros Bifs" to cook more than bacon sarnies, beans on toast, or even Fray Bentos ;).
    I think most of us will understand what you mean, even if you get the occasional word wrong - certainly better than any attempt I might make at culinary French.

    However, as you've asked...

    We tend to say "savoury or sweet", rather than salted.

    Bravo (y).

     
  20. yodeli

    yodeli Funster Life Member

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    Errrr.... No , not exactly, not to you English .... Only to French who want to learn: 1) how to cook French dishes (and also blackfoot ones) and 2): who want to practice their English.
    It's not on a forum , it's for real in my kitchen!
     
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