Electrical power for gas detector

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by terryallan, May 9, 2011.

  1. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    I am intending to fit a gas detector which requires a 12v supply and I assume that I should use the leisure battery for that supply.

    Deliberately, I haven't, at this stage, supplied what may be irrelevant information about control unit, battery and so on. I can however provide more info and photos if necessary.

    Basically, can anyone give me a lead in to the topic regarding what is professionally appropriate with regard to fitting a 12v supply to an item such as a gas detector in a motorhome?

    I hope that that is not too vague. :Blush:

    Thanks

    Terry
     
  2. DESCO

    DESCO Read Only Funster

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    Hi
    I personally prefer to have battery powered jobs, and replace the batteries on a regular basis, but no reason, just me.
     
  3. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    Just a thought
    Which is most likely to get flattened whilst away
    Habbitation Battery
    Starter Battery
    Take supply from least likely battery to get flattend:thumb:
    Geo
     
  4. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    More information

    Thanks for responses so far.

    Just for information, I have the Electrobloc EBL 269 control box/power distributor box in my motorhome.

    I will be fitting the SAS Etomer ET-999 Gasalarm and the ET-69 CO detector. The power consumption at 12v is 150mA-260mA, and so the current drawn is very low as would be expected.

    My current thought is to power the unit through a switch I will install from any suitably available block which supplies the power sockets, the lights or the TV.

    Comments would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Terry
     
  5. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    To quote Brian The Hilldweller
    where ever possible design the human error out of any system if at all possible
    Id say wire direct, via a fuse of course and do away with any chance of it being switched off accidentaly
    Geo
     
  6. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    With Geo .... No switch, just an in line fuse, however...

    260ma .. not a lot , but

    260 x 24hrs x 7days = 43,680 ma or 43A ... that's an 85ah battery all but dead in a week if not on an EHU
     
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  7. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    That's HUGE, MASSIVE, EXCESSIVE. You'd need your own private hydro-electric to run that.
     
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  8. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    Yes thanks good advice.
     
  9. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    Thanks, yes - interesting calculations. The switch was really to power-save and only have the detector on over-night but it has a backup battery which operates when power interrupted and so that wasn't too clever of me. :Doh::Blush:

    The most difficult problem at the moment is finding a place to put it. I am finding issues with every spot. Running cables 'invisibly' is also not too easy to certain locations even though the trunking is easy to access.

    I have decided that doing DIY in a motorhome is certainly more difficult than in a house - the words of a newbie motorhomer.

    Terry
     
  10. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Hi Terry... must agree, it isn't always easy to hide cables without stripping out a lot of lining ...
    A good solution in these situations is to use a piece of white mini trunking which can be run along the corner where the roof meets the walls.. never notice it .. buy at any DIY .. and it comes with or without self sticking adhesive..
    It also comes in a half round profile which is very neat and tidy ..
     
  11. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    Thanks again. I had been considering that option too but I am at the 'reluctant' stage with my head in the sand. I will return to reality shortly and take the pragmatic route. As you say once it is in place it isn't noticed.
     
  12. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    Our motorhome have these fitted fused to the leisure, and are switched to avoid any battery drain over winter/times not in use. We tell customers to switch on when cooking, or sleeping as most other times you will not need it.

    When turning on, they do take 2 minutes to set themselves.
     
  13. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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  14. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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  15. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    Another potential disaster waiting to happen:Eeek:
    If they forget
    Im sure the coroners report will mearly state Alarms inoperative:Doh:
     
  16. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    It's only an extra alarm - there are others on them. This one is more to put minds at rest from gas attacks. They have carbon monoxide detectors and smoke alarms seperate.

    As long as they are shown, and 'trained' in demonstration, and that is backed by the vehicle appliance book - then we are ok. It will I am informed, work on the same principle of turning the gas off/not having heaters on whilst driving - you can instruct them, but have no way of enforcing it.

    I know what you mean though! Health and Safety is a bit of a nightmare with hire - the expense we go through is starting to get a little too much. As we try to do things properly and cover everything, we only break even off season!

    I had a guy get really queer with me the other day, he had two labs he wanted to take. I told him we would have to ensure the dogs were comfortable and we could arrange a test viewing and I asked him if he would like seatbelt straps/harnesses or cages for them during travel...He was really insulted, and implied I was being cruel!

    We have a 'Duty of Care' towards peoples animals. We have to ensure they are comfortable and suited to a vehicle, and instruct the owners on how to care for them in that environment (not leaving them alone/ without water etc) Most are quite happy with it, even if it is an egg-sucking exercise - but others tell you where to go and storm off!:BigGrin:

    All we can do is advise and instruct - we cannot enforce how they do things.
     
  17. Sundowners

    Sundowners Funster Life Member

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    Hi
    I have worked out which fuse controls the alarm----------when we are not using the RV, I pull the fuse to save the battery--------
    Also its really embarassing if your battery goes down during the night and your neighbours are woken by it screaming (I think on most vans you can borrow power from engine battery if this happens ????)
    As we often store for several weeks at a time I just isolate the alarm and the battery remains charged-------this works for us:thumb::thumb:
    Nigel & Pamala
     
  18. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    Thanks for this information. Do you not put a 9v battery into the ET-999 gas detector module? I would have expected the 9v battery to take over when the main 12v power is switched off. The instruction leaflet also says that when the 9v battery drops to 7v the battery guard alarm sounds every 10 sec.
     
  19. terryallan

    terryallan Read Only Funster

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    Thanks again.

    The instruction leaflet says:
    ET999 typical 95ma @ 12vDC
    ET999 with ET68 typical 170ma @ 12vDC
    ET999 with ET69 typical 160-2600ma @ 12vDC
    ET999 with ET68 and ET69 210-330ma @ 12vDC

    ET69 is the CO sensor
    ET68 is basically another ET999 for another position in the motorhome

    There is also an ET67 which is an extra sound and light alarm. Perhaps when it is working in addition to ET999, ET68 and ET69 the consumption is 650ma. The leaflet does not give a figure for that.

    Apparently Calor through http://www.caravanning-online.co.uk/acatalog/etomer-twin-alarm.html no longer sells this unit despite it being on Calor's website.
     
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