EHIC Country-by-country guide to entitlement

Discussion in 'Continental Touring' started by Don Madge, Nov 8, 2007.

  1. Don Madge

    Don Madge Funster

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    I've compiled this list of the entitlement to services with the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) in each country. I carry a copy in my laptop.

    Safe travelling

    Don


    EHIC Country-by-country guide to entitlement

    AUSTRIA
    The Republic of Austria joined the European Union (EU) in 1995. The official language is German.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors: the Regional Health Insurance Office - Gebietskrankenkasse - will give you a list of doctors working under the state scheme. If you use a private doctor you will be charged but may be entitled to a partial refund.
    • Prescriptions: you can get prescribed drugs from any pharmacy but you will be charged a fixed amount.
    • Hospital treatment: you are covered for both out-patient and in-patient treatment, but you need a doctor's referral. There is a non-refundable daily charge for the first 28 days in hospital. If you are treated privately, whether at your own request or because of an emergency, you may be entitled to a refund from the Gebietskrankenkasse, (Regional Health Insurance Office) which vary from hospital to hospital.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The Gebietskrankenkasse (Regional Health Insurance Office).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Send original receipts with your claim. Keep copies of anything you send for your records.
    Where to get information
    The Gebietskrankenkasse (Regional Health Insurance Office) responsible for the area where you are staying.

    BELGIUM
    The Kingdom of Belgium was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). Dutch, French and German are the main languages.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors, dentists and prescriptions: you will be charged for seeing a doctor or dentist and for prescribed drugs. You can claim back 75 per cent of these costs.
    • Hospital treatment: you will have to pay part of the costs.
    • Ambulance travel is not covered.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    Sickness Funds Offices (Mutualité/Ziekenfonds).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    • Doctors or dentists: you will need to obtain a receipt on the official form (Attestation de soins donnés/Getuigschrift voor verstrekte hulp).
    • For prescriptions, obtain a receipt and ensure that your copy of the prescription is stamped.
    • Hospital treatment: you will need a certificate from the Sickness Funds Office (Mutualité/Ziekenfonds) stating that it will pay part of your costs.
    Where to get information
    The regional offices of the Auxiliary Fund for Sickness and Invalidity Insurance (Caisse Auxiliaire d'Assurance Maladie-Invalidité/ Hulpkas voor Ziekte-en-Invaliditeitsverzekering). Alternatively, the Local Sickness Funds (Mutualité/Ziekenfonds).
    Auxiliary Fund Offices are usually located in each provincial capital.
    Brabant Regional Office
    Rue du Trône 30B
    1000 Bruxelles
    Tel: +32

    CYPRUS
    The Republic of Cyprus joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. Greek and English are the main languages
    Exceptions
    A European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is not valid in the north part of Cyprus. You are strongly advised to take out comprehensive private health insurance before travelling to this part of the country.
    Please note any charges you pay in Cyprus are not refundable
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you can get treatment from doctors or dentists practising in state health centres. You will be charged a patient contribution of CYP1.00 for each visit to a doctor or dentist and CYP40.00 for each denture. These charges are not refundable.
    • Prescriptions issued by a state doctor are free. However, they must be presented to a state pharmacy. If you don't have your EHIC, you will have to get them from a private pharmacy and you will be charged.
    • Hospital treatment: you can only get in-patient treatment if a state doctor refers you to hospital, or if you are admitted through the accident and emergency department of a state hospital.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none. You will only be charged your share of the costs.
    Where to get information
    Ministry of Health
    10 Markou Drakou
    Pallouriotissa 1448
    Nicosia

    CZECH REPUBLIC
    The Czech Republic joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Czech.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: all treatment that a doctor or dentist considers necessary is free of charge. However, you must make sure they are contracted to the public health service (the Health Insurance Fund). If in doubt, contact the Centre for International Reimbursements (Centrum mezistátních úhrad).
    • Prescriptions are issued through doctors and dispensed by pharmacies. You will be asked to pay a share of the costs, which are not refundable.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none. You will only be charged your share of the costs.
    Where to get information
    Centrum mezistátních úhrad (Centre for International Reimbursements)
    nám. W. Churchilla 2
    113 59 Prague 3
    Tel: +420 2 34 462 041
    • Czech Centre for International Reimbursements (opens new window)
    • Email: info@cmu.cz (opens new window)

    DENMARK
    The Kingdom of Denmark joined the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU), in 1973. The official language is Danish; English is the predominant second language.
    Exceptions
    The Faroe Islands are not part of the European Economic Area. They have a separate reciprocal healthcare agreement with the UK which covers immediately necessary care only.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: consultations are covered. Ask if they are registered with the Danish Public Health Service. You will be charged, but can claim back the full amount of the doctor's consultation and part of your dental costs.
    • Prescriptions: you will be charged. Refund rates for approved medicines vary. There are no refunds of expenditure under DKK 520 for persons over 18 (for children, 50 per cent is refunded).
    • Hospital treatment: this is free. It will normally be arranged by a doctor, but if you can't see one, show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to the hospital authorities and ask them to arrange free treatment for you.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The local council (Kommunen).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    If you show your EHIC, you will be given a special card to register your prescription purchases on your first visit to a pharmacy. If not, keep all your prescriptions and original receipts and apply for a refund to the local council.
    Where to get information
    The Kommunen (local council).

    ESTONIA
    The Republic of Estonia joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Estonian; Russian is also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you will have to pay part of the cost of any treatment you receive, including home visits from a doctor. The charges are not refundable. Children under 19 can get free dental treatment, and adults do not have to pay for teeth to be removed or abscesses lanced.
    • Prescriptions: you will be charged a standard fee. Sometimes, you will also have to pay a percentage of the costs above the standard fee. If the medicine is not on the national list of medicinal products, you will have to pay the full costs. This is not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: if you are admitted as an in-patient, you will have to pay an in-patient fee of up to EEK 25 per day for up to 10 days per hospitalisation. There is no in-patient fee for children below the age of 19; cases related to pregnancy and childbirth; and intensive care.
    • Ambulance travel is free in an emergency.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are no reimbursements. You cannot claim a refund for any private treatment you have.
    Where to get information
    Estonian Health Insurance Fund (Eesti Haigekassa)
    International Relations Department
    Lembitu 10
    Tallinn 10114
    Tel: +372 620 8430
    There are also local offices in Tartu, Jõhvi and Pärnu.
    • Email: info@haigekassa.ee (opens new window)
    • Estonian Health Insurance Fund (opens new window)

    FINLAND
    The Republic of Finland joined the European Union (EU) in 1995. The official languages are Finnish and Swedish.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors: depending on the area (municipality) where you are staying, treatment will either be given free or for a standard fee. If you get private treatment from a doctor or hospital, you should get a receipt. You will be able to get a partial refund.
    • Dentists: for emergency dental treatment, contact the dentist on duty at the municipal health centre and present your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). A standard fee will be charged, depending on the service provided. You may find that state dental services are severely restricted.
    • Prescriptions: you will be charged the full amount, but you can claim this back from the local offices of the Sickness Insurance Department (Kansaneläkelaitoksen Paikallistoimisto or KELA). For most prescribed medicines you will get a refund of 50 per cent of the costs above a fixed rate.
    • Hospital treatment: a doctor will normally refer you to a public hospital, where you will need to show your EHIC. In an emergency, you can seek treatment from the nearest public hospital without consulting a doctor first. For in-patient treatment, there is a fixed non-refundable daily charge. For out-patient visits to a hospital, there is a fixed non-refundable charge.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The local KELA office. You must claim refunds within six months of the original payment. Charges for treatment vary from region to region.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts. Keep copies of anything you send for your records.
    Where to get information
    KELA (local offices of the Sickness Insurance Department).

    FRANCE
    The French Republic was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). The official language is French.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors, dentists and prescriptions: make sure the doctor or dentist you consult is 'conventionné' - i.e. they work within the French health system. After treatment, obtain a signed statement of the treatment given (a 'feuille de soins') - you can't claim a refund without it. You will be charged for the treatment you receive, as well as for any prescribed medicines, and the amount(s) should be shown on the feuille de soins.
    • Around 70 per cent of standard doctors' and dentists' fees are refunded, and between 35 and 65 per cent of the cost of most prescribed medicines. The cost of common remedies and items such as bandages are refunded at the lower rate. The cost of medicines marked with a ” vignette or N.R. is not recoverable.
    • Hospital treatment: you must pay for out-patient treatment and then claim a partial refund from the local Sickness Insurance Office (Caisse Primaire d'Assurance-Maladie or CPAM). If you are treated as an in-patient in an approved hospital and show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), the office will pay 75 per cent or more of the cost direct to the hospital. You pay the balance. You must also pay a fixed daily hospital charge ('forfait journalier'). The 25 per cent balance and the forfait journalier are non-refundable.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    Local Sickness Insurance Offices.
    Send your application for a refund (the feuille de soins and any prescriptions) to the nearest Sickness Insurance Office while you are still in France. The refund will be sent to your home address later, but it may be subject to a bank charge. Before sending the money order, the French authorities will send you an itemised statement of the amount to be refunded. This refund process normally takes around two months.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    When you are getting prescribed medicines, the pharmacist will hand you back your prescription and you should attach it to the feuille de soins in order to claim a refund. Medicine containers also carry detachable labels ('vignettes'), showing the name and price of the contents. Stick these in the appropriate place on the feuille de soins, and sign and date the form at the end.
    Where to get information
    Centre des Liaisons Européennes et Internationales de Sécurité Sociale (CLEISS)
    11 rue de la Tour des Dames
    75436 Paris Cedex 09
    Tel: +33 1 45 26 33 41
    • Centre des Liaisons Européennes et Internationales de Sécurité Sociale (CLEISS) (opens new window)
    Retiring to France – important changes to the French healthcare system that apply to those who are not yet in receipt of a UK state pension or other eligible benefit
    The French authorities are changing their domestic rules on eligibility for health care services for people not working in France. This means that some people including those retiring to France from other European countries (including the United Kingdom) and who are not yet in receipt of a state pension or other eligible benefit will no longer be covered by the French system and will need to take out private health insurance. These changes affect people living in France and do not apply to people making a temporary visit to France, e.g., on holiday.
    • Early retirees to France: important changes to the French healthcare system

    GERMANY
    The Federal Republic of Germany was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). The official language is German.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists. You will need to pay a fixed charge to see a doctor or dentist, which is not refundable.
    • Prescriptions: medicines prescribed by the doctor can be obtained from any pharmacy in exchange for the prescription. You will be liable for a percentage of the prescription charge. These costs are non-refundable. For 'minor' drugs and medicines, such as painkillers and cough mixtures, you may be charged the full amount.
    • Hospital treatment: you can be referred to a hospital by a doctor. In an emergency, you can go directly to a contracted hospital. The hospital will then contact the insurance fund so that they can confirm that your treatment costs will be met. For the first 28 days of hospital in-patient treatment, you will have to pay a fixed daily hospital charge, which will not be reimbursed. Patients up to the age of 18 do not have to pay this charge.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    If you are charged a patient contribution, this is not refundable. However, if you are charged the full cost because you do not have an EHIC or a PRC, you can apply for a refund if you are able to provide either of these items to the dentist or doctor that treated you within a set time scale. [For dentists this must be within 10 days of the date you obtained treatment. For doctor's, it must be within the same quarter. For example, the 4th quarter in Germany is from 1st October to 31st December. Any claims within this quarter must be made before 31st December.
    Alternatively, if your EHIC or PRC is rejected for any reason and you are charged in full, please apply for a refund through DWP on your return to the UK.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    The AOK (local Health Insurance Fund) or any Substitute Health Insurance Fund - Ersatzkasse, Betriebskrankenkassen or Innungskrankenkassen, etc

    GREECE
    The Hellenic Republic (Greece) joined the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU), in 1981. The official language is Greek.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    If you are charged for any services provided through the Social Insurance Institute (ΙΔΡΥΜΑ ΚΟΙΝΩΝΙΚΩΝΑΣΦΑΛΙΣΕΩΝ or IKA), make sure you secure a receipt with a number perforated across it.
    • Doctors and dentists: consultations and treatment are free. However, you will have to pay part of the cost of secondary examinations, such as X-rays. You will also have to pay for supplementary treatment, such as physiotherapy, and for dentures.
    • Prescriptions: for prescribed medicines, hand the prescription to any chemist in the IKA scheme - IKA offices will provide a list. You will have to pay a small standard charge, plus 25 per cent of the actual cost of the medicine, which is non-refundable. If you are charged in full, obtain a receipt and ask for the prescription back. Keep the self-adhesive labels from the medicines.
    • If you obtain medicines or any kind of treatment privately, you must pay the full cost. Take the original receipts and your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to the IKA within one month, and they will reimburse you up to the limit allowed for similar treatment by the IKA. If you are staying in a remote part of the country or on a small island, there may be no IKA office or facilities within easy reach. In this case you must pay the full cost of private treatment and apply for a refund on return to the UK.
    • If you are charged in full, you will need the original prescription and receipt. The self-adhesive labels from the medicines should be stuck on to the prescription - you will not get a refund without them.
    • Hospital treatment: following an IKA doctor's diagnosis you must ask for a 'ticket', which is your approval of admittance to a hospital within the IKA scheme. If you go into the hospital before obtaining the 'ticket', show the administration your EHIC and ask them to contact the IKA.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    IKA (Social Insurance Institute)
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    ΙΔΡΥΜΑ ΚΟΙΝΩΝΙΚΩΝΑΣΦΑΛΙΣΕΩΝ or IKA (Social Insurance Institute)
    8 Aghiou Constantinou Street
    Athens
    You can also contact the IKA's regional or local offices (ΥΠΟΚΑΤΑΣΤΗΜΑΤΑ) or branches (ΠΑΡΑΡΤΗΜΑΤΑ).

    HUNGARY
    The Republic of Hungary joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Hungarian.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you can get treatment only from surgeries that have a sign saying they are contracted with the National Health Insurance Fund (Országos Egészségbiztosítasi Pénztár or OEP). Doctors' consultations are free, and emergency dental treatment is generally free. Any charges you pay are not refundable.
    • Prescriptions: some prescription drugs are free; for others you pay all or some of the cost. These charges are not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: in-patient and out-patient hospital treatment is normally provided through a referral from a GP. Treatment is free of charge, although you will be charged for any extra services you request, for example, obtaining prescription treatment without a referral from a primary healthcare provider; using a healthcare provider other than the one specified by the prescribing doctor; unnecessarily changing the contents of prescription treatment, causing extra costs; or a better room, meals or conditions. Charges for extra services are not refundable.
    • Ambulance travel is free of charge.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none.
    Where to get information
    Országos Egészségbiztosítasi Pénztár (National Health Insurance Fund)
    Department of International Relations and EU Integration
    Vaci Street 73/a
    1139 Budapest
    Tel: +36 1 350 1618
    • Email: nemzetk@oep.hu (opens new window)

    ICELAND
    The Republic of Iceland is a member of the European Economic Area. The official language is Icelandic.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: go to a health centre or a doctor registered within the state scheme. You will have to pay a fee of IKR 700, which is not refundable. You will have to pay the full cost of any dental treatment. Children under 16 have to pay only 25 per cent.
    • Prescriptions: prescribed medicines can be obtained from any pharmacy. You must show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). You will be charged a set amount depending on the type of medication prescribed. Ask the doctor for a generic drug if possible, as these are generally cheaper than brand name medicines.
    • Hospital treatment: patients can be admitted to hospitals only when they are referred by a doctor. However, in emergencies, patients may be admitted immediately to whichever hospital is serving as the emergency hospital at the time. Hospital inpatient treatment is free if you present your EHIC. Otherwise, you will be charged.
    • Ambulance travel: patients must pay the full cost of ambulance transportation within Reykjavik. Elsewhere, the cost of ambulance transportation is limited to a maximum of IKR 2,400.
    • Non-EEA nationals resident in the UK may also be covered for emergency health treatment in Iceland under a separate agreement. You will need to produce your NHS medical card.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The State Social Security Institute. Normally, you will only be charged a standard fee, which is not refundable. However, if you think that you have been wrongly charged as a private patient, you can apply for a refund by presenting your original receipts to the main office of the Institute.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    State Social Security Institute
    Laugavegur 114
    Reykjavik
    Tel: +354 5604400

    ITALY
    The Italian Republic was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). The official language is Italian; German, French and Slovene are widely spoken in different parts of the country.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure the doctor you go to is a national health service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale or SSN) doctor. Their services are normally free. Surgeries are open from Monday to Friday but times vary. At weekends and on weekdays between 8pm and 8am, emergency services are available through the Guardia Medica. If you pay any charges, keep the original receipts and apply at the local health authority (Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale or ASL) for a refund. Most dentists are private. To get state treatment you will need to go to a national health service hospital or a dentist who is working in an ASL-managed centre.
    • Prescriptions: if an SSN doctor issues you with a prescription, take it and your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to the pharmacy. Some medicines are free; for others you will be charged a standard fee, which is non-refundable. The cost of medicines bought over the counter is not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: the ASL can supply a list of SSN hospitals or private hospitals that are affiliated to the state scheme. Depending on the region you are in, you may or may not have to pay for medicines prescribed in a hospital or for your ambulance travel. If you can't contact the ASL beforehand, show the hospital authorities your EHIC and ask them to contact the local office at once about your right to treatment under the state healthcare scheme.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The ASL (local health authority) - also known as AUSL.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    The ASL (local health authority) - you can get their number from a telephone directory, hotel reception, pharmacy or, in an emergency, by phoning 118.

    LATVIA
    The Republic of Latvia joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Latvian; Russian is also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors: you will be charged a standard fee for seeing a doctor. Children under 18 and pregnant women getting treatment relating to their pregnancy will not be charged.
    • Dentists: any dentist you see must be contracted with a Sickness Insurance Fund or with the Compulsory Health Insurance State Agency (Veselības obligātās apdrošīnāšanas valsts aġentūra). You will have to pay for most dental services. For children up to 18, most treatments are free.
    • Prescriptions: medicines are prescribed by doctors and dispensed by pharmacies. You may have to pay a prescription charge.
    • Hospital treatment: in an emergency you can go directly to a hospital. Otherwise, for in-patient treatment, you will need a referral from a GP or medical specialist. There is a hospital admission fee and a daily charge for in-patient treatment from the second day of an admission (up to a maximum limit).
    • Ambulance travel is free provided it is requested by the public health service in an emergency.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    You will not be reimbursed for any private treatment.
    Where to get information
    Local Sickness Insurance Funds or:
    Veselības obligātās apdrošīnāšanas valsts aġentūra (Compulsory Health Insurance State Agency)
    Baznicas 25
    Riga LV-1010
    Tel: +371 7043700
    • Latvian Compulsory Health Insurance State Agency (VOAVA) (opens new window)
    • E-mail: voava@voava.lv (opens new window)
    For information about healthcare in Latvia for EU citizens:
    Tel: +371 7043767
    • E-mail: eiropa@voava.lv (opens new window)

    LIECHTENSTEIN
    The Principality of Liechtenstein is a member of the European Economic Area. The main language is German.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you can see any doctor covered by a contract with the public healthcare scheme. You will have to pay a standard fee. There is no state dental treatment, and you will have to pay the costs of private treatment in full.
    • Hospital treatment: there is only one hospital in Liechtenstein. The competent authority should approve your admission, although no approval is needed in an emergency.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    National Office of the Economy (Amt für Volkswirtschaft).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Medical bills, original receipts and a covering letter.
    Where to get information
    Amt für Volkswirtschaft (National Office of Economy)
    Austrasse 15
    9490 Vaduz

    LITHUANIA
    The Republic of Lithuania joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Lithuanian; Russian is also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you can get treatment only from doctors or dentists contracted to a Territorial Patient Fund. Doctors' consultations and treatment are free of charge. There is no charge for a dentist's consultation but you will have to pay for any materials the dentist uses. Most dentists - 80 per cent - practise privately. If you see a doctor or dentist privately, you can't claim any money back.
    • Prescriptions: you can get prescriptions from a doctor. You will need to show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). Some medicines are provided free of charge; for others you will have to pay between 10 and 50 per cent of the cost. This is not refundable. If you are prescribed a medicine that is not available under the state scheme, you will have to pay for it yourself.
    • Hospital treatment: you can get treatment in the emergency section of a hospital. You can also be referred to a hospital for in-patient or out-patient treatment by a doctor. There are no charges for in-patient or out-patient hospital treatment. If you are treated privately in a hospital, you will have to pay. This is not refundable.
    • Ambulance travel is free.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    Generally, you will be charged only your share of the costs, which is not refundable. However, if you don't have your EHIC with you when you see a doctor, you may have to pay. You can apply for a refund when you get back to the UK. For more information on how to do this, contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    You can contact one of the five Territorial Patient Funds:
    Vilnius Territorial Patient Fund
    Placioji g. 10
    Vilnius 2600
    Tel: +370 52 661364
    Kauno Territorial Patient Fund
    Aukstaiciu g. 10
    Kaunas 3005
    Tel: +370 37 208846
    Klaipedos Territorial Patient Fund
    Taikos pr. 28
    Klaipeda 5802
    Tel: +370 46 380738
    Siauliu Territorial Patient Fund
    Vilniaus g. 267
    Siauliai 5400
    Tel: +370 41 520043
    Panevezio Territorial Patient Fund
    Respublikos g. 66
    Panevezys 5319
    Tel: +370 45 596192

    LUXEMBOURG
    Luxembourg was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). The national language is Luxembourgish; French and German are also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors, dentists and prescriptions: you can go to any doctor. You must pay for treatment and prescribed medicines. Make sure you get receipts for everything you pay for. You will be able to get a refund, although not always for the full amount.
    • Hospital treatment: if a doctor thinks you need hospital treatment, they will issue a certificate which you should give to the hospital authorities. Treatment is normally free but you must pay a non-refundable daily charge. If you can't contact a doctor before being admitted, show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to the hospital authorities and ask them to contact the Sickness Insurance Fund.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The local Sickness Insurance Fund office (Caisse de Maladie des Ouvriers).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    Caisse de Maladie des Ouvriers (Sickness Insurance Fund for Manual Workers)
    125 Route d'Esch
    L-1471 Luxembourg Ville
    The Fund also has local offices.

    MALTA
    The Republic of Malta joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official languages are Maltese and English.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: emergency medical treatment is available free from doctors in government health centres. Acute emergency dental treatment is provided free of charge in hospital out-patient wards or government health centres, but is not widely available. Most dentists practise privately.
    • Prescriptions: any prescription charges incurred are not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: emergency treatment in the accident and emergency department of a government hospital is free for both in-patients and out-patients. Any medication prescribed during in-patient treatment, or for the first three days after you are discharged, is free, but you will be charged in full for anything prescribed after this period. These charges are not refundable.
    • Ambulance travel is free in an emergency, as long as you can prove that you are entitled to treatment.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    If you can't prove that you are entitled to treatment and have to pay for it, you can apply for a refund when you get back to the UK. For more information on how to do this, contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    Entitlement Unit
    Ministry of Health
    24 St John's Street
    Valletta CMR02
    Tel: +356 21 22 4071
    Fax: +356 21 23 0863
    • Email entitlement.mhec@gov.mt (opens new window)

    NETHERLANDS
    The Kingdom of the Netherlands was a founder member of the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU). The official language is Dutch.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure you see a doctor who is part of the health insurance scheme. Treatment is usually free. State dental care in the Netherlands is limited to treatment for children.
    • Prescriptions: some prescribed medicines are free, for some you pay part of the cost, and for others you'll have to pay the full cost. These charges are not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: doctors will need authorisation from the AGIS Verzekeringen for you to get free hospital in-patient treatment. If you can't contact a doctor before being admitted, show the hospital authorities your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) and ask them to contact AGIS Verzekeringen in Utrecht immediately.
    • Ambulance travel is free only if a doctor agrees that it is necessary.
    Where to get information
    AGIS Verzekeringen
    PO Box 1725
    3800 BS Amersfoort
    Tel: +31 33 44 56 870
    Local Health Insurance Fund Offices (Zorgverzekeraar) can tell you how to access medical services and give you the names and addresses of GPs, health centres and hospitals that operate within the state system.

    NORWAY
    The Kingdom of Norway is a member of the European Economic Area. The official language is Norwegian.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure you see a doctor who has a reimbursement arrangement with the National Insurance Administration. This includes most medical practitioners. There is a non-refundable standard fee. You will usually have to pay the full cost of any dental treatment.
    • Prescriptions: you will have to pay for most prescribed medicines. However, if you are prescribed medication by a doctor on a blue prescription (generally medication for chronic conditions) you will pay only 36 per cent of the costs, up to a maximum of NOK 360 per prescription.
    • Hospital treatment: charges are payable for specialist consultations and out-patient treatment. Normally, a GP will refer you to hospital. In an emergency, you can get treatment from the nearest public hospital. Hospital in-patient treatment, including necessary medication, is free of charge.
    Where to get information
    Lokale Trygdekontor (Local Sickness Offices)
    or
    Folketrygdkontoret for Utenlandersaker (National Office for Social Insurance Abroad)
    PO Box 8138 Dep 0033
    Oslo 1
    Tel: +47 2331 1300

    POLAND
    The Republic of Poland joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Polish.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: healthcare in Poland is provided by units that have a contract with the National Health Fund (Centrala Narodowego Funduszu Zdrowia or NFZ). In an emergency, go to the nearest basic healthcare GP and make sure they are contracted to the NFZ. If they are not contracted to the NFZ, you will be charged as a private patient and will not be able to get a refund. Check that the dentist you go to is contracted to the NFZ, otherwise you will be charged privately. Only basic emergency dental care is provided free of charge.
    • Prescriptions: depending on the medication, you will have to pay between 30 and 50 per cent of the price, the full amount, or a fixed price. These charges are not refundable.
    • Hospital treatment: you can go directly to a state hospital in an emergency and get free treatment. A GP can also refer you to a hospital and decide if you need an ambulance. Medicines provided in a hospital are free of charge.
    Where to get information
    Central NFZ (National Health Fund) and regional branches
    ul. Grójecka 186
    02-390 Warszawa
    Tel: +48 22 572 60 36 or +48 22 572 61 12
    Fax: +48 22 572 63 30
    • NFZ website: Access to health care during a temporary stay in Poland (opens new window)

    PORTUGAL
    The Portuguese Republic joined the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU), in 1986. The official language is Portuguese.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: in mainland Portugal, go to the nearest health centre (Centro de Saúde). Show your passport or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), and ask to be treated under the EU arrangements. You will be charged a non-refundable standard fee. Dental treatment is limited under the state scheme. You will probably have to pay, and the charges are not refundable. In Madeira (an autonomous region), you can get a partial refund if you see a private doctor. Make sure you get an official (green) receipt.
    • Prescriptions: for some prescribed medicines, you will have to pay between 30 and 80 per cent of the cost. There is no charge for prescriptions issued for certain serious illnesses ('A Level').
    • Hospitals: basic hospital treatment is free, but you'll have to pay for secondary examinations, such as X-rays, and laboratory tests.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    In Madeira, contact the Regional Health Service Office (Administração Regional de Saúde). The refund will cover only a very small part of your total bill.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Official original receipts.
    Where to get information
    Mainland Portugal: the nearest Administração Regional de Saúde (Regional Health Service Office).
    The Azores: the Regional Health Service Directorate in Angra do Heroismo.
    Madeira: the Regional Health Directorate in Funchal
    Direccao-Regional de Gestao
    Rua das Pretas, hr 1
    Funchal

    SLOVAK REPUBLIC
    The Slovak Republic joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Slovak; Hungarian is also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure the doctor or dentist you see is contracted to the main health insurance company. You will have to pay a non-refundable contribution. If you don't have a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), you will be charged for treatment and may not be able to get a refund. Some basic emergency dental treatment is available free of charge, but you will have to pay a non-refundable contribution.
    • Prescriptions: there is a non-refundable flat fee for each prescription, and you may have to contribute to the cost of the medicine itself. Pharmacies can give you a list of nationally subsidised drugs.
    • Hospitals: a doctor can refer you to hospital, or you can go to the casualty ward of a hospital for emergency treatment. You will have to pay a daily charge (up to a maximum of 21 days) each time you are admitted. All other services and medicines are normally free, but there may be substantial non-refundable charges for complex procedures. If you go to hospital but are not admitted, you will also have to pay a fee.
    • Ambulance travel: if a doctor asks for an ambulance for you, you will be charged a non-refundable fee. If the doctor doesn't think you need an ambulance, you will have to make your own arrangements. In a life-saving emergency, there is no charge for ambulance travel.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none.
    Where to get information
    • Ministerstvo Zdravotníctva (Slovak Ministry of Health) (opens new window)

    SLOVENIA
    The Republic of Slovenia joined the European Union (EU) in 2004. The official language is Slovene; Italian, Hungarian and English are also spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: you can get free emergency medical treatment from a doctor in a public health institution, or from a private doctor who is contracted to the Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (Zavod za Zdravstveno Zavarovanje Slovenije or ZZZS). If you see a doctor who is not contracted to the ZZZS, you will not be able to claim a refund. You can get emergency dental treatment from dentists contracted to the ZZZS.
    • Prescriptions: for some prescription drugs, you will have to pay 25 to 75 per cent of the cost; for others you will have to pay the full cost. These charges are not refundable. Some drugs are provided free of charge.
    • Hospitals: a doctor will refer you to hospital. In an emergency, you can go to the emergency department of a hospital where you can get free treatment.
    • Ambulance travel: if a doctor refers you to hospital, ambulance travel is free, otherwise you will have to pay 70 per cent of the cost. This is not refundable.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    If you don't have a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), you will have to pay for your treatment and apply for a refund when you get back to the UK. Contact the Department for Work and Pensions for further information.
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Contact the Department for Work and Pensions for more information and form IPC 1679.
    Where to get information
    The nearest regional office of the ZZZS (Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia). The office will be able to give you a list of private doctors and dentists contracted to the ZZZS.
    • Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (ZZZS) (opens new window)

    SPAIN
    The Kingdom of Spain joined the European Community, the forerunner of the European Union (EU), in 1986. The official language is Spanish.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure the practitioner you see works within the Spanish state health service. In some parts of the country, particularly the outlying islands, you may have to travel some distance to attend a state surgery ('consultorio'), health centre ('centro sanitario') or hospital clinic ('ambulatorio'). If you need to call out a doctor in an emergency, make it clear that you have an European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) and that you want to be treated under the EU arrangements. Whenever you need treatment, show your EHIC. Dental treatment is not generally provided under the state system, and the costs will not be reimbursed. In Spain, doctors, health centres and hospitals have separate surgery times for private patients and those treated under the state health service. If you are asked to pay, you are not being treated under the Spanish health service and your EHIC will not be accepted.
    • Prescriptions: medicines prescribed by health service practitioners can be obtained from any pharmacy ('farmacia'). You will have to pay up to 40 per cent of the cost unless you are a UK or other European Economic Area (EEA) pensioner, in which case the medicines will be free of charge. You must show proof that you are a state pensioner, otherwise you will be charged 40 per cent of the cost, which you can claim back on your return to the UK. If a hospital says you need medicines after you are discharged, you must take the medical report to a GP, who will give you a prescription.
    • Hospital treatment: a doctor will usually arrange any hospital treatment you may need. In an emergency, you can only get free treatment in a public ward at a public hospital. You must show your EHIC; if not, you will be charged as a private patient and will not get your money back. Under the strict terms of the Spanish health service, there are no refunds for private healthcare charges. Make sure you have private medical insurance in case you are treated in an emergency in a private hospital. Doctors in the emergency departments of state health service hospitals will prescribe medicines on the appropriate medical report, but do not issue official prescriptions. You must take the report to a primary care doctor who will issue the official prescription.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none. However, if you are a state pensioner and are charged for your prescriptions, you can apply for a refund when you get back to the UK. Contact the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) for more information.
    • Useful contacts
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    Servicio Regional de Salud (Regional Health Service Offices).

    SWEDEN
    The Kingdom of Sweden joined the European Union (EU) in 1995. The official language is Swedish; English is widely spoken.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • Doctors and dentists: make sure the doctor you see is affiliated to the public insurance scheme. You must show your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), or you will be charged the full cost of the treatment. With an EHIC, you will still have to pay part of the cost, which is not refundable. You will also have to pay the full cost of dental treatment up to a fixed limit, and most of the cost above this limit. Any reductions will be made before you get your bill.
    • Prescriptions: you will have to pay the full cost of any prescription drugs up to a limit, and part of any costs above this limit.
    • Hospitals: you can go to any public hospital. In-patient care is free, but you will have to pay part of the cost of any outpatient care. There is a fixed, non-refundable daily charge.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    There are none. Provided you show your EHIC, you will only be charged non-refundable fees for public health services. The costs of private treatment are not refundable.
    Where to get information
    The Lokala Försäkringskassan (local Social Insurance Office).
    Non-EEA nationals living in the UK may be covered for emergency health treatment in Sweden under a separate reciprocal agreement. You will need to show your NHS medical card.

    SWITZERLAND
    The Swiss Confederation applies the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) arrangements through an agreement with the European Union (EU). The main languages are Swiss German, French and Italian.
    What treatment is covered and what will I be charged for?
    • You will normally have to pay the full costs for treatment and services and claim a refund afterwards. You will have to pay a fixed charge for each 30-day period of treatment. This is known as the 'excess charge' or 'patient's contribution' and is not refunded. It is recommended that all visitors take out adequate private travel insurance.
    • Doctors and dentists: go to any doctor registered with the Swiss health insurance scheme. Dental treatment is not covered unless it results from serious illness or accident.
    • Hospital treatment: you will normally be referred to a public hospital by a doctor. In an emergency, go directly to the emergency department of any public hospital. In-patient treatment in a general ward of a public hospital is covered, but not in a semi-private or private ward, or in a private hospital. As well as the excess charge, you will have to pay a small, non-refundable, fixed daily in-patient charge for the cost of board and accommodation.
    • Ambulance travel: you will have to pay 50 per cent of the costs of ambulance transport within Switzerland, including air ambulance.
    Who handles reimbursements?
    The Common Institution the Federal Sickness Insurance Act (Gemeinsame Einrichtung KVG).
    What documentation do I need to claim money back?
    Original receipts.
    Where to get information
    Gemeinsame Einrichtung KVG (Common Institution)
    Gibelinstrasse 25
    Postfach
    CH-4503 Solothurn
    Tel: +41 32 625 48 20
    Fax: +41 32 625 48 29
     
  2. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    Excellent info Don. Can I copy it and post it as a download? I fear it may get lost among all the posts and different threads.
     
  3. Don Madge

    Don Madge Funster

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    Hi Jim,

    Yes, no problem. :BigGrin:

    Don
     
  4. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    Hi Don, I have uploaded it as a pdf file in your name, its here. Thanks again:thumb:
     
  5. Don Madge

    Don Madge Funster

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    EHIC entitlement update.

    Jim,

    The EHIC entitlement info was last updated in Feb. 2007 so I think it might be wise to check here http://tinyurl.com/2y5jxu to make sure that the info is up to date before travelling.

    Could you attach this to the download please.

    Don
     
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