Eggs

Discussion in 'Cooking' started by ROB1CHELSEA1, Aug 15, 2015.

  1. ROB1CHELSEA1

    ROB1CHELSEA1 Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,431
    Likes Received:
    5,622
    Location:
    Park Lane Bedhampton
    White Eggs – All chicken eggs start out with white shells made primarily of calcium carbonate. No matter what breed the chicken or what color an egg ultimately ends up being, all eggshells begin as white. The white egg-laying breeds, including Leghorns, Andalusians, Catalanas, Lakenvelders among others, don’t possess any pigment genes, so they lay white eggs. Because Leghorns were specifically bred to eat little and lay a lot, they were the darling of the commercial egg industry and thus the reason why most store bought eggs were primarily white … until recently. The perception that brown eggs are fresher and more nutritious (neither true, by the way!) has led to the introduction of brown eggs to grocery store chains in recent years.

    Brown Eggs
    – The brown egg layers such as Rhode Island and New Hampshire Reds, Australorps, Buff Orpingtons, Delawares, Brahmas and Plymouth Rocks, possess brown pigment genes and a brown ‘dye’ is applied (by the hen of course!) to the eggshell fairly late in the laying process; around the last 4-6 hours of the total 26 hours it takes to form the egg. This results in a brown-shelled egg. Interestingly, the inside of a brown egg is always white – the brown dye doesn’t penetrate the shell, leaving the inside the original color.

    Blue Eggs – There are three breeds that lay blue eggs: Ameraucanas, Araucanas and Cream Legbars. The blue color is created by oocyanin, which is applied early in the laying process. The blue pigment goes right through the shell, unlike the brown pigment. So blue eggs are blue inside and out.

    Green Eggs – Green egg-layers, such as Easter Eggers and Olive Eggers, are created by cross breeding a blue-egg-laying breed and a brown-egg-laying breed and those hens possess both blue and brown genes. Therefore the eggshells are green on the outside (created by mixing blue and brown) and blue on the inside, having been ‘painted’ with both blue and brown dye.

    (y) Rob
     
    • Like Like x 6
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,441
    Likes Received:
    16,867
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    Very interesting.
    Now tell me why all egg whites are clear until cooked and why all egg yolks are a shade of yellow. ;)
     
  3. DavidG58

    DavidG58 Funster

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6,272
    Likes Received:
    12,098
    Location:
    Bolsover, Derbyshire
    IMG_0894.JPG

    double yolkers courtesy of @Terry, only ever had them once before, that was just luck in a pack from a shop, Terry arrived at Falkirk saying he had some, I didn't believe he could tell from the outside, still not sure how he did. They were big though, but not as yellow as our local free range :)
     
  4. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,441
    Likes Received:
    16,867
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    Worked in a private house last week and they had 3 hens....just common red/brown variety.

    They had free run of the garden AND HOUSE.
    Got fed up avoiding hen shit in the house and eventually ignored it and just walked through.
    At best they would get 3 eggs a day but when they asked if i would like a couple of dozen eggs i suddenly remembered i have an egg allergy.
    Almost got caught out on the last day, i was asked if i would like an omelette....
    The answer would have been yes, but no telling how old they could be. :eek:
     
  5. ROB1CHELSEA1

    ROB1CHELSEA1 Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,431
    Likes Received:
    5,622
    Location:
    Park Lane Bedhampton
    Not a clue pappajohn :rolleyes: but today i bought blue eggs and will wait till the morning to taste them. I was once given some some rather large eggs from a bloke in Devon and all were double yolks and delishous(y)
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2010
    Messages:
    16,399
    Likes Received:
    34,384
    Location:
    kent
    I don't eat eggs except scrambled and omelettes.

    Boiled, fried and poached make me feel sick for some reason.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. ROB1CHELSEA1

    ROB1CHELSEA1 Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,431
    Likes Received:
    5,622
    Location:
    Park Lane Bedhampton
    Are you leaving the shells on Chris:ROFLMAO:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. jollyrodger

    jollyrodger Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3,409
    Likes Received:
    6,673
    Location:
    Plymouth
    Sooooo when you have a boiled egg do you go in through the little hend or the big hend ?:)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,441
    Likes Received:
    16,867
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    Only in the microwave :LOL:

    One of lifes mysteries.....where does the rest of the microwave egg go.
    There isnt enough left in there to scrape out to fill half the shell.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Larrynwin

    Larrynwin Funster

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    8,486
    Likes Received:
    12,678
    Location:
    Norfolk
    I love em, tasty however cooked . They do need grit in their diet for shells to form.
     
  11. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,441
    Likes Received:
    16,867
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    Anyone had a SOFT egg.
    No shell at all, only the soft membrane.
    As Larry said, lack of grit i believe
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. ROB1CHELSEA1

    ROB1CHELSEA1 Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    2,431
    Likes Received:
    5,622
    Location:
    Park Lane Bedhampton
    Never had a soft egg. Just read it's a Hybrid. Hybrids do not breed true so when you need more of them, you have to go back to crossing the original stock again.
     
  13. Robert Clark

    Robert Clark Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2014
    Messages:
    5,567
    Likes Received:
    9,662
    Location:
    East Sussex
    We've got a flock of free range hens and have found that hens at the end of their laying life tend to lay eggs without shells, whereas pullets (hens coming into lay) sometimes lay double yolk eggs
     
    • Like Like x 3
  14. Nirvanauk

    Nirvanauk Funster

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,360
    Likes Received:
    6,417
    Location:
    God's county. North Yorkshire.
    Not sure if that's correct really, the grit is to act as teeth as they don't have any so helps in the digestive process. However I stand to be corrected as always...
     
  15. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6,253
    Likes Received:
    12,383
    Location:
    Cornwall
    The EGGS we get are from LidL chooks, don't know where they keep them but they lay heaps!. the only chooks we've seen there have been these featherless variety, think they must be from up north 'cause they roost in the freezers (y)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Robert Clark

    Robert Clark Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2014
    Messages:
    5,567
    Likes Received:
    9,662
    Location:
    East Sussex
    image.jpg
    We hatched these chicks to replace 4 hens who have stopped laying
    image.jpg
    And the next batch are due to hatch on Monday
    La Bresse Gauloise - apparently the French consider them the best tasting chicken
    Christmas dinner !
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. Baycott

    Baycott Funster

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2013
    Messages:
    6,302
    Likes Received:
    10,481
    Location:
    East Sussex
    When we had our shop, the lady that owned the boutique next door also had a chicken farm. She was forever bringing us eggs and always the double yolkers (y)
    When I was a lad my friends family had a farm and he and I would often collect the eggs in the morning. That was the one and only time I have ever seen a soft shell.
     
  18. Glandwr

    Glandwr Funster

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2014
    Messages:
    618
    Likes Received:
    1,689
    Location:
    the Berwyn Mountains
    Just be thankful that they didn't have a gaggle of geese keeping down the grass! :LOL:

    Dick
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    8,563
    Likes Received:
    11,535
    Location:
    Plympton, Devon
    You should have taken the eggs, they would have been a cut above typical so-called free range eggs from a supermarket. You would have known if any was too old - they would stink!
     
  20. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,441
    Likes Received:
    16,867
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    Eggshell formation requires gram amounts of calcium being deposited within hours, which must be supplied via the hen’s diet.

    Chicken feed grit provides the calcium for the shell, of which 95% is from crushed sea shells
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page