Ducato based MH prone to wheel spin on grass?

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Richard W, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. Richard W

    Richard W Read Only Funster

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    My MH is based on a front wheel drive 2004 Ductao 2.8 chassis cab. It’s OK on dry grass, but I’ve had to use the tractor to extract it if the grass is wet or soft. It spins the front wheels quite easily, although it does seem to be better in reverse. Could this be due to a lower gear ratio for reverse? I suspect it is down to my cr*p driving…

    Is there a technique for getting this style of MH off a damp / soft grass pitch? I guess the other option is snow chains, although it would make a bit of a mess of the grass and involve a lot of mud removal from the MH.

    All ideas and advice welcome.

    Happy Travels,
    Richard W.
     
  2. bobandjanie

    bobandjanie Funster Life Member

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    Hi Richard what you need are some Bread trays and cut the sides off and park on them. :thumb: And tyres with M + S on them. :Smile: Bob.
     
  3. acting_strange

    acting_strange

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    You can also try drawing off in second instead of first gear...
     
  4. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Make sure you can exit downhill.

    They are completely useless for traction. If you haven't noticed on every bend and every roundabout in the wet you're driving like a wuss.
     
  5. upmarkethippy

    upmarkethippy Read Only Funster

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    bread tray bases are the most common as they are light.
    There are a number of different methods that are also available.
    And agree that m + s on tyres is a good idea..
    To narrow down on looking, kumho do a tyre, kl85 and also marshal do a 'road venture'.
    Both these tyres i have found are used on commercial vehicles so should have a heavy enough load rating. These may look to be aggresive but they have very good road manners.:thumb:
     
  6. Richard W

    Richard W Read Only Funster

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    Thanks for the comments. I have noticed that it can spin the wheels on the road, if doing a spirited set-off from a road junction.

    One problem with the parking spot was that it was beside the (grass) taxiway. I’m used to aircraft handling grass easily (better than tarmac in some cases). There again, they don’t use their wheels for traction.

    The MH has been moved to a harder standing location, which solves the problem for the moment. I’m just getting a bit wuss-ish about soft / slick surfaces.


    Cheers,
    Richard W.
     
  7. davejen

    davejen Funster

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    Swap it for a mercedes based m/home!
    Cheers, Dave:thumb:
     
  8. MAUBRI

    MAUBRI Funster

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    I agree with the other Brian ( thats got to be a first ).:Rofl1:

    I used to have a Hymer ( Fiat Ducato )which had a rear garage half the time I couldn't even get off Dry grass.:cry: Always try and park downhill and always reverse onto a pitch with the driving wheels nearest the tarmac. If at all possible Try repositioning your load so it is closer to the front wheels than the back. After many failed attempts of getting off grass and wheel spinning going up a hill in Wales on a B class road I now have changed to a Rear wheeled drive RV.

    Brian
     
  9. simsy56

    simsy56 Funster

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    Its because its front wheel drive, and the bulk of the weight is over the rear axle. Thats why rear wheel drive is better for traction on wet grass. l will give you an instance, a loaded 2 wheel drive dumper will ascend a slippery slope better in reverse than forwards, in effect having the drive wheels at the back, also, an automatic gearbox is better for drive control.

    Craig
     
  10. Richard W

    Richard W Read Only Funster

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    Thanks for all the info and advice. I did wonder about the apparent improved traction in reverse. I thought the problem was the weight (of the engine etc) and the relatively high gear ratio in first gear.

    I’m interested in tyres as per upmarkethippy’s advice. Would these help with improved traction on snowy roads? As mentioned previously, I’m thinking of investing in some snow change.


    Cheers,
    Richard W.
     
  11. peter marshall

    peter marshall

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    Hi Richard
    Same idea as the other posters, but you have to park on them when you set up, and have a clear line of exit til you get on solid ground before you stop and retrieve the trays, ps the yellow wheel mats you buy at the delers are not up to it. Pete :thumb::thumb:
     
  12. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    Wet grass has the same traction characteristics as snow - so treat it like snow!

    As you are front wheel drive, and by motor homes' nature, they have alot of weight on the rear, you will be prone to spinning the wheels. Reverse will gain better traction, especially up hill, as you are effectively making it 'rear wheel' drive.

    There are lots of options, but best solution is planned parking, and a little thought. Try to park in the direction you will be leaving. If you a slope, make sure you are facing down hill.

    Try the back onto the leveling ramps, as this will give you momentum for departure and stop you sinking. Bread crates are also popular 'sand ladders' that will stop sinking, and aid traction. You can get away with those sample carpet mats if all else fails!
     
  13. alcorn54

    alcorn54 Read Only Funster

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    Always pushes better than pulls

    Front wheel drive in the wet will always push better than pull.

    Same in the snow,so on damp or wet grass or in the snow always try to pull away in a lower ratio gear like second or even third if real slippy and slowly, you'll get better traction. Also when going up a hill in the snow constantly ,and (slowly) move you wheels left to right for extra grip I know youll zig zag but it really does works:thumb::thumb: .:BigGrin::BigGrin: was taught advance driving and how to drive in slippy conditions in the army years ago never fogot it,Mind you!! it was mostly in a tank :Rofl1::Rofl1: Also a good tip on braking ,Never slam your barakes on in the wet always pump them on and off even in an emergancy ,itll stop you a lot quicker and ( no aquplaning or skidding )

    One more tip,in the winter tie wrap a thin board or tin foil over the front of your radiator or the inside of your grille ittl help stop freezing cold air keeping water cold as your driving ,so your thermostat wont open for a much long time hence cold feet ,also your auto choke will remain on longer in petrol cars hence using more fuel. As wheather warms up remove it ,or as soon as you notice your temptture gauge starts to get hoter than normal ,this tells you it needs more air through radiator to keep cool.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2010
  14. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Your theory is fine but I have to say that if you do that in a FIAT you'll cook the clutch and they are specifically excluded from warranty for that reason.
     
  15. alcorn54

    alcorn54 Read Only Funster

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    Fiat clutch

    Why a FIAT clutch?? Are they made differantly ?

    Pulling away ocassionally on wet or slippy surfaces in a lower ratio gear wont really damage your clutch (will it?) unless you really give it some welly? by over reving and slipping your clutch.

    Ive done it all my adult driving life (over 35years) various vehicles,buses, lorries ,cars ,vans, etc and neve changed a clutch yet:Eek!:
     
  16. pablomc

    pablomc Funster Life Member

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    Only valid if you do not have ABS. :Smile:
     
  17. alcorn54

    alcorn54 Read Only Funster

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    Gosh i'm getting old forgot about that:thumb:
     
  18. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Yes. Made out of recycled cardboard.

    Which is not good when the load is 3.5T and the driving skills of this forum in general will be far lower than yours.

    Destroyed clutches featured in the juddergate threads.

    I don't recall ever having a clutch go on me in 50 years driving. My wife cooked my 2.8 Capri towing a horse box but luckily after adjustment it recovered. I'm amazed and horrified at reported clutch replacements on MH forums. People accept it as normal.

    What is nasty on our 2003 FIAT is a restrictor in the clutch which limits its engagement time. Once up hill on the M6 I slipped it down a gear and hit the throttle too quickly and the clutch did not bite 'till I backed off. That must be 10K miles or more ago, about 10K on the clock, but it still worries me.
     
  19. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

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    AH! HAH! So! Richard is the fella that left those tracks on the grass at the Tewksbury Abby site!
     
  20. JJ

    JJ Funster

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    If God had wanted us to use front wheel drive He wouldn't have given us the propshaft...

    JJ :Rofl1: :Rofl1: :Rofl1:
     
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