Don't let the weather spoil your evening

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Big bus man, Nov 4, 2015.

  1. Big bus man

    Big bus man

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    Back in the 80's & 90's I was a very keen amateur photographer, I specialised in low light pictures so I was always out hoping for a sunrise or sunset, night pictures were one of my favorites as the streets emptied and all the parked vehicles moved out of the scene, some of my best pictures were taken after rain, the reflections of light the colours from different bulbs and the odd headlight helping light that dark corner, the colours were amazing when I left the shutter open for longer periods to allow the film capture what the naked eye does not, but practice allows you to spot what others would thing is a waste of time. The point is even the best digital cameras can't capture what would be your best ever picture unless you set it correctly so next time you are out on a soggy evening don't look at that lovely view that would be great if it was sunny look at the way light walls on something, rain on a wall with reflections of coloured light can be more stunning than a scenic view that everyone takes and holds many more memories of a location.
    I sold many pictures back in the day most of which were low light pictures, some can still be seen today on postcards around Brighton and on regional calendars, I was even Amateur Photographer of the year back in 1997 so I am qualified to help you take a better picture.
    Bit of a daft thread I know but try a time exposer shot of a daylight scene with clouds and be amazed what happens to the scene, for instance rough water can suddenly become calm and clouds have motion. I really should take up photography again!!
     
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  2. NickNic

    NickNic Funster Life Member

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    Traffic trails are a good fun simple way of practicing low light, long exposure shots as well. You will need a tripod though.

    If you want to take it on from there find a model or subject who can keep still for a long exposure, get them in the frame as well and use rear curtain flash to light them. Once you get the hang of it the results can be quite interesting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2015
  3. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    How strange. I bought a new camera yesterday (nothing special just a Canon Powershot SX610HS) and Jill mentioned the merits of taking shots in low light and after rain.
    In earlier years I was never much good at photography because I find it difficult to squint through a viewfinder. I find a digital camera with a screen much easier and, hopefully, I'll take some decent shots in future.
     
  4. Big bus man

    Big bus man

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    GJH, you will take good shots but rarely will you get a stunner because it will be the same as everyone else can get. Generally speaking every good picture can be broken down into thirds, the scenic view is obvious but less so with architectural record shots. My advice being decide what it is you are photographing, it won't be the scene it will probably be an element of that scene, a building; and area where light is falling; a huge cloud; basically the object that attracted you to look at the scene. Now use that element as 1/3rd of the picture area then look for something as foreground interest, this might be obvious like a tree or just another element filling another 1/3rd of the frame, the remaining area will be a third element, usually sky but not always. It is important to remember here that these elements fill approximately 1/3rd of the picture area and that may be made up from various areas within the image. The theory works, I used take record shots like Tower Bridge and without the foreground interest it is mostly sky so I looked for something to even the image out, using a close section of the bridge as 1/3rd worked but doing the same image in say a sunset the bridge may no longer be the subject as now it is the sky or various cloud formations what I am photographing the bridge being just another element. Still don't think I am right, look at some pictures that you consider great and see if they break down into thirds. It soon becomes second nature to look for foreground interest.
     
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