dogs and a small motorhome

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by duetto owner, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. duetto owner

    duetto owner Read Only Funster

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    thinking of getting our first dog and have a ford duetto.

    a few questions.

    when driving does the dog just sit in the back or do you pop them in one of those plastic travel boxes/cages.

    at night do they sleep in the camper or tie them to lead outside.

    any other info you could advise wolud be handy, thinking of getting a victorian bulldog [like a bulldog but with longer legs and the face is not so squashed in] if we can find one.

    what about campsites do any refuse dogs or are they generally accepted

    anything else that we should need to know
     
  2. Ralph-n-Bev

    Ralph-n-Bev Funster

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    Hi
    If your buying a puppy , get it used to a cage / crate. You can get the rigid metal ones or the pop up fabric ones. Our 2 Border Terriers ( aged 13 and 1 ) have always used one. Its their space . They choose to use :BigGrin:
    A dog harness attached to a d ring, somewhere safe floor level , if you don't have space for a cage , is also a good idea.
    Some people convert the garage in the MH to a kennel , if they have a big dog. Or don't have 3 kids and need the bunks like us !! Ive also seen the rear garage , with the high bed above , used as a dog space. Converted with a cage door into the MH.
    As ours are only little they have full use of the MH. Caged to travel .
    Though they are not allowed on the furniture, at home or in the MH. Start as you mean to go on. If you get a pup and let them up, when they are full grown they will still want to lounge on the sofa.

    Now all this goes out of the window if you want a surrogate child/dog of course.
    These are usually allowed to travel on the drivers / front passengers knee. Sleep on the furniture, or bed with their owners :Rofl1::Doh:
    Each to their own.

    I doubt many tie their dogs up outside overnight by the way :thumb:
    Wed like a black French bulldog , I'm not sure if Ive seen a Victorian one . I'm sure your new pup will become a beloved part of the family and bring you loads of enjoyment , and exercise .

    Bev
    Forgot to say,
    dogs are welcome most places . As long as you are a responsible owner, pick up the poo. Keep them on a lead. Tie them up out side , don't let them wander.
    Most of all teach them from day 1 not to be a yappy dog. Theres nothing more anoying than a dog yapping all day long.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  3. Hayleylulu

    Hayleylulu

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    we have a small dog in are fiat ducato and she stays in the back and sleeps with us in the van:thumb:
     
  4. dellwood33

    dellwood33 Read Only Funster

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    Our little Jack Russell has a harness that clips to the seat belt in the dining area.
    We do carry a folding crate as well - handy for outside during the day if she wants to escape the sun.

    Rosie sleeps inside at night - it is after all HER motorhome :BigGrin:
     
  5. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Most sites both here and abroad accept dogs, nearly every French van has a dog
    Look for sites that advertise a dog walk , but many are now charging £2 -£3 per night , always best to check before booking or on arrival.

    If you travel abroad you need a Pet's Passport.. another topic, but it costs upwards of £200

    Motorhomes and dogs are made for each other, Our JRT sleeps inside, the very vest alarm you can have.. :thumb:

    Worth noting:

    Germany has strict laws on dangerous breeds, this is is list of banned dogs..

     
  6. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    I would have a crate to carry them in when travelling. This is fairer to the dog, and in the event of an accident, he doesn't go far. There are also clip on seat belt straps that attached to the collar that are quite good, though i would recommend a body harness for these, and you can do serious damage to the neck, if not break it in a collision.

    When you are out, do not leave the dog in the vehicle - even if the winows are open, they get extremely hot and can die in ten minutes. Roof top air con is great for this purpose if on hook-up. This will keep the vehicle at a set temerature. But do give him a blanket somewhere out the way, like the loo area, should he get too chilly and want somewhere to hide. Plenty of water obviously.

    If you are getting a bulldog, then you also have to consider the practicalities of leaving outside, be that overnight, or unattended - these dogs are worth alot of money and are very sought after. It is not uncommon for some stranger to take them for a walk on your behalf if you know what i mean.:Eeek:

    Ours tends to sleep inside, in his bed. We have one of the soft sponge beds that fits in there nicely. Keep a spare old sleeping bag - some night cans get a little chilly, and these are ideal for throwing over them so they can nest.

    Some sites are not dog friendly, but most are as long as they are on a lead, and not noisey. Even some sites that do not allow dogs, will allow then if you walk them off site.

    Enjoy, and good luck with your search!

    If you want a rare dog, that is loving, loyal and a good guard dog - and one that doesn't bark too much - have a look at the Glen of Imaal! :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  7. Compass57

    Compass57 Read Only Funster

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    I want a pee

    I have a male boxer he sleeps under table while on the move, ok I know table should be stowed but sometimes can’t be a5red to do so.
    Occasionally he will visit us at front just to say where the fcku are we and how far do we still have to go because I’m wanting a pee.
    At night if we sleep above cab he’s under table but during day when stationary he’s tied up on a long lead that’s if we have stopped near a main road if not and we are in the middle of nowhere he’s allowed to wonder where he likes providing no sheep or cattle about.

    Bip.:thumb:
     
  8. motorhomer

    motorhomer Read Only Funster

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    Our dog is smaller than yours, but she travels very happily in her basket between the front seats, and never moves until we stop. - she sleeps there as well.

    Be aware that some countries have different regulations. In Spain when travelling dogs must be restrained and separated from the driver , so in spain she also wears a harness.
     
  9. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    If you keep your dog in the front - be careful if you are stopped - there should be a physical barrier between him in the back and you. You can be prosecuted for it. Foreign countries are often more strict on this.
     
  10. finby

    finby Read Only Funster

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    Our labrador trabels between the driver and passenger seats - always has, always will:BigGrin:
    She sleeps in the van at night, on a cushion bed she uses at home.
    When on site, she is tied to the m/h step, but we have a long lead (its a training lead of about 30 ft, and is lengthened / shortened as required).
    We always take her with us when on holidays, and she looks forward to coming with us and gets excited when she sees the van being loaded. She is the first one on the van on departure day, and positions herself between the seats in preparation for the journey!!
     
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  11. GregM

    GregM Read Only Funster

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    Our Labrador generally lays on the floor in the habitation area while traveling, sometimes she will try and sit with the kids in the dinette area. Now and again she wanders up to the front with us and rests her head on Tracey's lap as if to say 'are we there yet? how much further?'.

    Like others we have a long lead which we the to the van step when on site etc. On one occasion (our first with her) she was on the lead but came back into the van, the window was open and she saw the kids playing and wanted to join in. She decided the quickest way to do that was out of the window, luckily the collar snapped and she carried on, unharmed, chasing the kids.

    At night she sleeps under our made up bed in the lounge area, or near the heater if it's on.
     
  12. robnchris

    robnchris Funster

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    dogs & M/H`s

    First thing is which dog are you going to choose, we have a Jack Russell nice and small, only leaves small prezzies when you are out walking and being a small dog means everything you need for the dog is small also.

    Tiggi travels with us sitting in her bed between driver and passenger seat, and as previously mention is the first one in the van with her bag packed ready to go.
    At night she sleeps almost in the same position depending on her mood, women :Doh:.
    The collaspable cages are a good idea if you have the storage for them, surprised just how many sites accept dogs as long as you are in control of them, also it`s good to find a pub that will take a dog.
    Mind you we are talking real country pubs here not the plastic imitation ones.

    No matter which dog you decide upon you can be certain that you will have a friend forever and whilst out walking you will be amazed at the people that stop and talk just because you have a dog. :thumb:
     
  13. DESCO

    DESCO Read Only Funster

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    We travel with 2 toy poodles and they each have their own small crate. This is their domain and we find they never use each others. They always put themselves to bed in their crates and are no problem, if they want to be alone during the day they will also retreat to the crates.

    They are also handy for outside the van, with the dog tethered by the crate it is somewhere they feel they can retire to if they feel troubled.

    We also use these at home for them and they use them just the same. We have had quite a few dogs and have always found that they all will use crates the same. I think they regard it as their kennel.

    Most sites will take dogs it pays to ask if not mentioned when booking, some charge we always give those a miss.


    Dave :thumb:
     
  14. Heyupluv

    Heyupluv Read Only Funster

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    Our labradour travels like Gregs (we had two chocolate Labs up to ten days ago, one 14 years old he got to point he could not lift his back end up, all be it on lots of medication from the vets, so we took him to the vets who said nothing could be done and the best would be to put him to sleep....so sad :cry:) our other younger choc Labrador generally lays on the floor in the habitation area while traveling, sometimes under the table in the dinette area. Now and again he wanders up to the front with us and rests his head on the wife's lap to have a look around to see what is going on.

    Mel
     
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  15. buttons

    buttons Funster

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    We used to have a Briard, not a small dog, we had the habit of hooking his lead over the tow ball while we were packing up. We were leaving a site one day when the kids who were looking out of the rear window screamed dad Morris can’t keep up he is running as fast as he can. After that I always put a note on the steering wheel when he was hooked up to the tow ball. True story. :Eeek:
     
  16. Ralph-n-Bev

    Ralph-n-Bev Funster

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    Oh dear....
    good job the kids noticed , or his legs would have been considerably shorter:Eeek::Eeek:
    Bev
     
  17. duetto owner

    duetto owner Read Only Funster

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    some great replies enjoyed reading them, just got to find where i can get one now. puppy or adult
     
  18. Losos

    Losos Read Only Funster

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    That message needs repeating a million times - I find it utterly amazing that there are so many new dog owners who don't know this (BTW I am not pointing the finger at the OP here)

    A dog does not sweat (Like horses and humans do) so can not disipate body heat very easily. The only way a dog can cool down is by panting (fast breathing)

    Every summer in the UK alone many dogs die a horrible death due to the pure ignorance of owners - it's not rocket science FFS.
     
  19. gazz

    gazz Formerly "gazznhelz"

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    we travel with a border collie cross and 4 fancy rats.

    the rats have a cage on the wall of the motorhome, and a run accross the van and the pelmets of the windows, and are only shut in the cage when traveling,

    the dog, she is free to roam the van when traveling, as she likes to go in the back for a drink every now and then, but she spends her time either in the front curled up on the floor infront of the passengers feet, or on one of the sofa's in the back (usually watching white trucks go by, she loves white trucks for some reason, no other colour ones interest her)

    i have had an accident in the motorhome with her free in the back, but we hit a car so hardly felt a jolt, she knew something had happened, but wasnt sure what,
    obviouselt hitting a brick wall or a truck would be different, but it's upto the individual to assess the risk and act aproprietly.

    when we are camping, she loves to sit on the cab seats and just watch the world go by, bit of a pain that i made my motorhome with a seperatable cab via an electric sliding door,

    she is a rescue dog, and is a real pain on a lead, she behaves much better off lead, but after 5 years of working with her, she is begining to accept being restrained,
    so when on a campsite she goes on one of those lines with a screw in anchor, positioned so she can reach the end of the awning and come into the van if she wants.

    at night she sleeps under the bed (made up from the sofa's) occasionaly she'll come on the bed with us, she is free to go where she wants at home and in the van, so she is a sofa dog,

    when i had a scooter i made her a trailer from a dog crate and a chassis and suspension, with a tow bar that swiveled, and towed her behind us on the scooter, as she loved being with us,
    now i take the smart car with us she just goes in the back of that, but i do take her everywhere with us if possible.
     
  20. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    Hi

    There are some things that you probably need to think about before you get a dog, not in any particular order!

    1) How much time are you willing to give a dog? When 'motorhoming' (in a motorhome, van conversion etc) you cannot just let a dog out as you would in your own garden, you have to be there with it, allow time for walks, feeding, grooming (if required), play etc. This can place restrictions on how you currently 'holiday' in your 'van, so you really need to be sure that are prepared and willing to accept this. You're van is small so leaving the dog in it in hot weather whilst you go for a wander is going to be severly restricted, it's not as bad as a car but not much better.

    2) Are you prepared for the training that you'll need to undertake, whether it's a puppy or an older dog, they all need training to a greater or lesser degree, this takes time and patience. Then there's the clearing-up ... the bigger the dog the bigger the .....:Blush:

    3) Cost of the dog, vaccinations and vet's fees - make sure you're realistic about this, some can be very hefty, consider pet insurance and check what is covered (eg does it include cover whilst on holiday abroad?).

    4) You also need to consider all the stuff you'll need in the 'van for your dog too, bed, toys, towels, food ... have you got space for them? The larger the dog the more food etc you'll need.

    5) Foreign travel - if you go to foreign parts, you'll need to get the Pet Passport sorted - this take a MINIMUM of 7 months, that's assuming it works okay the first time, which it generally does but some peple have found that they've had to repeat the rabies vaccination which adds another month on at least. The cost, depending on where you live and size of dog, can range from £150-£300, plus every time you return from holiday abroad you have to visit a vet 24-48 hours before your return crossing, which is more expense (from £20-£80, again depending on size of dog and the location of the vet).

    6) Have you looked into the 'nature' of the breed you are considering? Is it a suitable dog for the lifestyle you have? It is not a breed I am familiar with but this is an interesting link with info about them:

    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/victorianbulldog.htm

    On the whole, they seem to be happy around people but they can SNORE and DROOL a lot apparently! :Eeek:

    They are also quite hefty dogs too by the looks of it - I would therefore be sure as to whether this is a suitable dog for the size of van you have ... it could prove costly if you found you had to get a larger 'kennel on wheels' for the dog!:Doh: Oh, don't forget to check the payload of your 'van ... have you got enough spare for the dog and it's chattels?

    --------------------

    We have 2 dogs, Lily (Savage) who's a Patterdale terrier (or terror!) and Romy, a Staffie/Greyhound cross - like a small greyhound on steroids! Romy travels on a large bean-bag between the passenger and driver's seats, Lily travels on a large cushion on my knee (can't trust her on the floor as she's too quick and could get under hubby's legs whilst he's driving ... tried putting a barrier to stop her but hubby kicked the cruise control lever whilst getting into his seat one day ... £50 thank you very much!!!), and she doesn't like harnesses in the rear, and forget a cage .....

    If safe and okay to do so, on sites/aires etc, they can potter round the outside of the 'van, so long as they won't cause problems for anyone, otherwise they're on long leads. On a night they sleep either side of the dinette on the seat cushions. You can't leave a dog outside unattended, regardless of the risk of them being nicked (yes, it does happen unfortunately and for a pure bred as you're looking at it would almost be a certainty if you left it unattended on a night), so you need to ensure you have somewhere in the 'van where it can call it's own.

    Some campsites allow dogs, others don't, we avoid any that charge as a general rule (we don't use many sites anyway).

    We wouldn't dream of going anywhere without our dogs, but we've always had them and have accepted some of the restrictions that go hand in hand with the joy of them too.

    Please do make sure that this is the right decision for you ... think carefully as, to pinch a quote from a well know organisation ... "A dog is for life, not just for Christmas" ... or holidays!
     
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