Dog Laws in Spain and why there is confusion.........

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Don Quixote, Dec 9, 2015.

  1. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    Spain is changing, and more municipalities are attempting to create dog friendly beaches, but in general dogs are not allowed onto beaches. This is quite simply down to money, as beaches are the lifeblood of the tourist trade and councils are obsessed with obtaining quality ratings for their beaches, so making sure visiting tourists are not treading in piles of dog excrement is high on the agenda of every council during the summer months.

    Although a blind eye is often turned during the winter months, and everyone who has been in Spain for more than a few months will concur, many dog owners do take their dogs onto beaches, but this is breaking the law and should a council be on a clamp-down, then it is a fineable offence.

    The path to creating dog friendly beaches is a rocky one, as although some residents will call for a beach on which they can exercise dogs, there will always be other residents who oppose it and complain about dog excrement and noise.Sometimes a beach is declared dog friendly and then within months this has changed, so the best advice is to call your local tourist office and ask.

    All pets in public places must be properly identified (microchipped)and secured by a lead, chain or collar.

    Any dogs who are listed as potentially dangerous canines must wear an obligatory muzzle appropriate for the breed of the animal. Likewise, these animals must be led by a non-extensible lead or chain of less than 2 metres and one person may not take more than one dog.

    Those animals that are in a farm, cottage, villa plot, terrace, patio or any other defined location shall be tied up or restrained unless they are in a suitable enclosed living space to protect people or other animals that are in the vicinity.

    It is strictly prohibited for animals to have access to sandy beaches or public bathing areas, as well as sandy areas in squares or streets.

    People who walk dogs must prevent the depositing of droppings on sidewalks, pathways, gardens or generally any place that is dedicated to pedestrian traffic. The person in charge of the animal is required to collect and remove droppings in a hygienically acceptable way by using a plastic or paper bag or a dustpan and depositing them in the nearest container. If there is no designated rubbish container provided, they should be taken to the roadside and deposited at the curb as close to the sewerage system gutters as possible or in an area that is not intended for pedestrians or a designated play area. In some areas of Spain you can be fined 1000 euros.

    Generally, dogs may be loose in enclosed areas that are provided for this purpose by the Ayuntamiento (Town hall), with the exception of those who present a danger to other users of the facility. In public parks where there are no enclosed areas, dogs must be on a lead.

    Additional useful dog information for newcomers / visitors to Spain.

    By law, all dogs must be microchipped and vaccinated. Both of these processes can be carried out by local vets.

    Be careful when allowing any domestic pet to interact with stray dogs which may not have been vaccinated.

    When transporting pets, make sure that they are secured in the back of the vehicle and not loose on the seats ( this also applies for cat boxes). Loose items on back seats are also illegal.

    Screens can be purchased to create a physical barrier between the front and back of the car, or special leads purchased to secure dogs in the back of a vehicle.
    It is illegal for unsecured animals to travel in a vehicle. Loose items on back seats are also illegal.

    It is well worth purchasing collars to protect against sandflies as these protect leishmaniasis, which is a widespread, fatal illness found in many dogs in Spain, particularly those in the countryside. Treatment of this illness can prove expensive long term, so a collar is a worthwhile investment and also protects against ticks. Cheap fleacollars offer no protection against leishmaniasis and ticks.

    Lungworm tablets are inexpensive and also a good investment.

    Beware procession caterpillars in the spring, the hairs can easily kill a dog. Walk dogs well away from areas where these are found and if you see a string of these caterpillars on the floor do not approach them and do not permit your pet to touch them. Every year cats and dogs die from touching procession caterpillars.

    Do not touch the nest with your hands.

    I hope this helps you a little when visiting Spain
     
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  2. Onemanandhisdog

    Onemanandhisdog Funster

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    Useful information, I wasn't aware of some of it despite taking mine to Spain at Easter

    What an absolute cheek humans have to decree that other species are not allowed on their beaches!

    If I had the money I would send one of mine to the European Court of Canine Rights!
     
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  3. DiggerJon

    DiggerJon Funster

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    Simple! Don't have a dog. Problem solved! (Now wait for torrents of disagreement.....)
     
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  4. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    We have a dog but actually agree with you Digger
    Why ? Cos the rules are pretty easy to abide by and if someone with a dog cannot do it then yup, don't have a dog !
     
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  5. Speve

    Speve Funster

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    @Don Quixote thanks for all the good advice,as I understand it the sand flies are usually May-September and caterpillars start around April, is that correct?
     
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  6. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    The problem here in Spain is the great weather and because of that the caterpillars can be found from early December in parts of Spain and the sand flies I have no idea sorry.
     
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  7. Speve

    Speve Funster

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    Yes we have spotted the cocoons in lots of places but only seen caterpillars once and that was in Portugal end of April.
    Thanks again
     
  8. gus-lopez

    gus-lopez Funster

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  9. Gary217

    Gary217 Funster

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    Very helpful thread thanks. We're planning a trip round Spain in May/June and the dog comes with us, so this info is very useful.
     
  10. Speve

    Speve Funster

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    :xThumb:@gus-lopez thanks for the link Gus we are usually in your part of the world from end Dec until mid April, it's really helpful to know the details.
     
  11. Gary217

    Gary217 Funster

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    Actually, having read the above and looked at the link we're now re-thinking our plans for our spring trip and will probably avoid Spain. We've read other bits about the Spanish not being very fond of dogs (especially black ones apparently and ours is very black) so we might leave Spain for a few years. Shame as I quite like tapas and Rioja, but there's plenty of other places to visit.
     
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  12. urban_biker

    urban_biker Funster

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    I'm also unlikely to visit while our Springer is still with us. Hes an energetic dog and there is no way he (or we) could survive without regular exercise off lead. Probably too hot for him anyway.
     
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  13. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    @Gary217, I'm not sure where you read this please provide links as the Spanish love dogs. We have a dog show every year in our village, so know this as fact.
     
  14. Speve

    Speve Funster

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    We always go mid Dec and return April we have a working cocker and a terrier we've never had a problem at that time of year and there are plenty of places you can let the dogs run if you are sensible about it,Please don't be put off as this thread is just providing info for you to use and be aware of there are thousands of dogs that visit during winter and very few have problems.
     
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  15. bellabee

    bellabee Funster

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    We started to get a bit paranoid last year, in Spain. Our dog is a three-legged Dalmatian, so always attracts attention, but in Spain people were stopping in the streets and openly staring at him. Just not what we Brits are used to, at all! At home, people are much more 'polite', they just whisper and look at him out of the corner of their eye.
     
  16. Antonio

    Antonio Funster

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    Lived in the Alpujarras with 3 cockers. The local children asked if they could walk my dogs, the old women in the villages knew me because of my dogs, the vets were great. I let them off the lead on the campo with no problems, as they were well behaved. The farmers said 'ha, cockers' the huntsmen knew the breed and we talked a lot about dogs. I got bigger tapas in the bars ' por tu perros' and always fresh water. I took them to beach's where I knew the were allowed. The med has no tide. I cleaned up after my dogs. I only have one now and she has just ended her Leish injections in the UK. I plan to go back soon in the MH with my dog. I found that in that part of Spain they love dogs.
     
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  17. bellabee

    bellabee Funster

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    Yes, all the children wanted to stroke our dog, too. We found no anti-dog sentiment at all.
     
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  18. Gary217

    Gary217 Funster

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    We agree - ours likes to have a good run so its not for us. We dont have an issue with this and although we are dog lovers, we're happy to accept that dogs are not for everyone and if Spain restricts them that's fine and we understand that, so we won't take her there.
     
  19. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

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    The only 'dangerous' animal I found when walking Meg in Spain (Not on a lead, slapped wrist) was a 6ft Montpelier snake who crossed our path. Meg wanted to chase it but I called her off as they are venomous, though apparently only mildly so.
    20110504083429.jpg
     
  20. jockaneezer

    jockaneezer Funster

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    We got some scornfull looks at our two in Luxemburg, can only guess people thought we were starving them or something, Germany on the other hand was a different story, lots of folks came over to stroke the 'Wind Hundes'
     
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