Does LPG corrode over time?

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by American Dream, May 26, 2009.

  1. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    I guess what I'm trying to ask is, are there other impurities in LPG that corrode the components/injectors etc in an LPG Fuel system over time and what should be looked out for?

    Do you get condensate in the inside of tanks etc if left almost empty over the winter or is it different in a "pressurised" environment?

    Steve.
     
  2. 45eEver

    45eEver Read Only Funster

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    I used to inspect aluminium cylinders for corrosion Steve.
    The cylinders were scheduled to be inspected after 10years, and then annually.

    I never found any.

    I think the risk of corrosion is very very low.

    There is no risk of condensation in cylinders left nearly empty.

    It wasn't unusual to find oil/water sludge in cylinders last century.
    The suppliers seem to have cleaned up their act.

    Cylinder should be inspected/tested regularly.
    From memory, after 10 years, but they may have brought in new regs.

    The PRV at the top needed replacing every 10 years, but there may be new regs.
    Pressure Relief Valve.
    The spring is under compression and weakens.
     
  3. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    I had an oily black sludge come out of the gas pipes on my old Rockwood when I took the fridge freezer out a few years ago.Someone said it was from the rubber pipes,but I had my doubts<I think it came from the fixed LPG tank.
     
  4. 45eEver

    45eEver Read Only Funster

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    The only way you could get sludge out your propane cylinder is to turn it upside down Snowbird.
     
  5. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    think thats the crap that blocks regulaters if they are mounted too low.....
    it leaches from the rubber gas pipes
     
  6. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Hi,The only way you can turn an LPG tank upside down is to turn the coach upside down,and I never managed to do that.:Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1:
     
  7. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    Many Thanks 45er.:thumb:

    Are they all aluminium or is it only the "newer" ones?

    Are the PRV's easy to replace?

    :Eeek::Eeek::Eeek:Now you don't want to be doing that!!!!!

    I'm sure I've read about some sort of hose degradation on a forum recently.Do the filler hoses degrade being constantly in contact with the lpg?
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
  8. 45eEver

    45eEver Read Only Funster

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    The hoses that degrade are are made from red "rubber".

    All the filler hoses I've seen are made from very high pressure hoses.
    They are made from much more serious "rubber".

    I've one that is over 30 years old.
    I've never seen any sign of degration.

    The trick with the red hoses is to make sure there isn't a low point in the line.
    The easiest way I know is to wind a pig tail curl in the hose between the valve and the cylinder so that any oil formed in the pipe drips down into the cylinder rather than getting blown up into the reducing valve.

    Most refillable cylinders are made from steel, which is less likely to corrode in this situation than aluminium.
    Some seem to be made from a type of fibreglass.
    Others are made from titanium.

    You can replace the PRV yourself AD.

    You need to take the following steps in a very well ventilated area.

    1) Make sure the tank is very empty.
    2) Take the tank off.
    3) Unscrew the PRV using a brass spanner.
    4) Screw in your new PRV.
    5) Pressure test for leaks.
    6) Replace the cylinder under the vehicle.
    7) Pressure test for leaks again.

    In addition you probably need a Corgi Certificate for your insurance company.

    All in all, it's better to plead ignorance or get the job done by a trader.
    Who should burst pressure test your cylinder at the same time.

    A new cylinder might be the most cost effective way.

    The PRV's are usually very tight so brass spanners aren't much use.
    Most folks use steel spanners.
    I've had to use a long Stilson with a 6ft cheater bar on occasions.
     
  9. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    Many Thanks.:thumb:

    Is there any risk re sparks etc?

    I was thinking of using a compressor to make sure the tank is fully vented.

    Is lpg heavier than air ?It's a case of finding the same size cylinder I guess if I have to replace.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2009
  10. Tony Lee

    Tony Lee Read Only Funster

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    Might be safe to get an expert to do the job.
     
  11. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    It's just a case of trying to find one locally as it'll need certification afterwards.

    I thing I've found one though. A very helpful chap called John Hickson @ Carlton le Moorland.:BigGrin:
     
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