cheyenne 660 spare wheel decision!

Discussion in 'Auto-Trail' started by roger loiselle, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. roger loiselle

    roger loiselle Deleted User

    Having had a new 660 delivered we have spent 4 months getting ready to go fulltiming, setting off to France end of February. The one remaining concern I have, is the lack of a spare wheel. Does anybody have any comment or advice?
    The dealer said it shouldn't be a problem and the repair kit is enough to cover a puncture, this comment does not give me peace of mind what do you think?
    Roger Loiselle
  2. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    Personally I would not go out of my driveway without a tidy spare .I travel a lot in France and would not feel confident not having a spare onboard .As far as I am concerned it's just penny pinching . Ask the dealer if you do get a puncture and the kit is of no use would they be prepared to cover your costs. Just bought a Autotrail Miami on Renault base , and that has a proper spare wheel supplied . Have fun might see you over there in May .:thumb:
  3. Terry

    Terry Funster

    Dec 27, 2007
    Likes Received:
    South yorks
    Hi personally I would want a spare :thumb: chances are you will shred the punctured wheel or damage it beyond any aerosol fix.Aerosol is OK if it goes down while stood but not a lot of use if it punctures while moving hence damage to tyres
  4. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

    Jul 29, 2007
    Likes Received:
    At the very least carry a spare tyre, you may be able to strap it under your chassis if you have no place for a spare wheel:thumb:
  5. Oscarmax

    Oscarmax Read Only Funster

    Oct 22, 2008
    Likes Received:
    We to have a Cheynne 660, provision is already been made the rear unslung locker, my missses would not go out in the van untill I brought a spare.

    Buy the 16 inch spare whhel from Puegeot, it is exactly the same as the Fiat, but cheaper.:RollEyes:
  6. wiljoy

    wiljoy Funster

    May 23, 2008
    Likes Received:
    Crook, Durham
    A friend of mine with a new motorhome last June was holidaying in the Highlands Of Scotland. A puncture occured which he thought would not be a problem. By the time he had stopped the tyre was wrecked. He waited in a lay-by for 4 days until a new tyre was obtained and delivered to him by a national tyre company, decision is yours. Is it worth the risk to rely on the so called kit to repair a tyre on a 3.5 ton, or more, vehicle.
  7. Stephen & Jeannie

    Stephen & Jeannie Read Only Funster

    Aug 27, 2008
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    Gobowen near Oswestry !!
    Never mind the puncture ! I have an auto-trail scout again 3.5 tons and when i pointed out the scissor jack to the guy who does my servicing he burst out laughing and said to use that would be inviting disaster ! so i now use green flag if necessary ! :thumb:
  8. shifter

    shifter Read Only Funster

    Jan 18, 2009
    Likes Received:
    wee island across pond NI

    he was right to laugh

    i tried to change wheel with sissor jack compleatly utterly efin useless!!!

    It ended up bending and buckling in half.luckely the wheel was still on by 2 nutts when it callapsed

    now use 2 tone bottle jack
  9. Tony Lee

    Tony Lee Read Only Funster

    Sep 28, 2008
    Likes Received:
    This came up on another forum so might be worthwhile reposting my recent tale of woe


    As some say, you can go years without needing a spare -- but then again --

    Set off from Stuttgart for this trip - Hobby on a Ford Transit chassis less than 2 years old with new winter tyres on the front and pulled into an aire in NE France to stay the night. Loud hissing from the RH front wheel, Damn, damn, damn. Brand new tyre - insert your own expletives here.

    Still it was just the wheel that was a bit high so was convenient in a way. Next morning changed it for the spare - after a huge struggle. Jack wouldn't go high enough so needed a base. Couldn't get the spare out from under because needed to jack the vehicle up a bit. Need that base. Where was the base?? Ahha - it was the strange package inside the spare that was stopping me from sliding the wheel out far enough to unhook the cable. [insert more expletives]
    Next morning found a tyre place and eventually got around the language barrier. "blowout" turned out to be the tyre valve stem pulling apart. Cheap repair. Never heard of a valve stem failing. Recessed in to far to get scraped on a kerb. !!!!!!

    Three days later pulled into an autogas station in Spain. Rear left tyre down a bit so went to pump it up. Couldn't because any pressure on the valve stem caused it to leak faster. What the !!!!!!!!. TWO similar failures in as many days. Luckily the spare was still in the boot so changing it was a piece of cake - relatively - although if I had known the nearest tyre place was only a couple of hundred metres away, I might have rolled the dud there to get it fixed. Half the price of the French repair so things are looking good.

    Hit Morocco and head south to find the sun that is supposed to start shining somewhere over the Spanish border but has yet to be sighted. Pulled into a camping spot and once again the dreaded hissing noise. This time the front left tyre and yet again, the #$#%$$%^$!$#%$$%^$% valve stem. On with the spare again and had to drive the whole day to find a repairer who had some new valve stems. THIS TIME changed the dud and the one on the rear right that was destined to fail within a couple of days.

    I am a member of ADAC and they would have come to my aid, but I reckon it would have been stretching the friendship a bit to have three calls in two weeks in three different countries - especially the last one which would have been a couple of hundred km.

    Would I drive without a spare on board - no way. In Australia I blew 3 drive tyres (truck size and each one on an inside wheel) within a couple of months and two of those were well out of any possible service area of the regular motoring organisations.

    Ultraseal??? Yeah, right!!!

    More on ADAC - We left Agadir to head inland. Stopped to buy some bread and couldn't get the engine started again. [insert lots more expletives] Lights were dim - must be flat engine battery - alternator must have failed. $$%^$*$# Tried pushing it, charging up battery from adjacent welding shop, Jumping from the leisure batteries, towing with a tractor, jump starting #$^$^%$. Finally found bad connection on engine battery. Easy to fix, but I wish they didn't put batteries under swivel seats. #@@*&&
    Still no go. Strange. Battery perfect and fully charged. Starter worked perfectly when bridged out. Finally realised that the security code on the key had been wiped due to low voltage/arcing etc because of the dud battery connection. Worse still, I had used both keys at various times and BOTH were dud. Long story short - caused a lot of entertainment to the local school kids but after one call to Germany and two conversations with their agent in Agadir, a nice new recovery truck turned up within a few hours and the efficient Moroccan dragged our MH up on the back without damage, drove carefully back on the undulating road and dropped us at the local Ford dealer - about 150km one way. Free, Gratis, costenlos. Great service and it is good to know that if it had been one of us that was misfiring instead of the MH, it would have been their medical emergency team that would have responded.
    Ford tech took 5 minutes with his laptop and 700 Dh bill to recode the security system and we were on our way again.

    Thanks ADAC
  10. roger loiselle

    roger loiselle Deleted User

    cheyenne 660 spare wheel decision

    :thumb:Thankyou to all, I am off to get a spare wheel next week! Storage is not a problem although I imagine a couple of boxes will have to be sacrificed to account for weight, I am buying a different wheel spanner as the socket supplied comes away from the wheel to far to be able to offer a decent 'purchase', my friendly mechanic tried the jack and was impressed. Roger Loiselle
  11. Spacerunner

    Spacerunner Read Only Funster

    Apr 7, 2008
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    My Chausson comes with a spare, but I know its going to be a 'pig' to retrieve from the furthest dark recesses of the chassis.
    Imagine my surprise and delight when reading the Caravan Guard insurance policy to find a clause that covers fitting the spare wheel in the event of a puncture.
    Carrying a spare is great, but if its secreted in an almost inaccessable stowage, and if your not as young and flexible as you used to be make sure you have a 'cunning plan' in the event of an emergency.
  12. ronald4874

    ronald4874 Read Only Funster

    Oct 31, 2008
    Likes Received:
    Poole Dorset
    Ron W

    Fortunately I have never had to change wheels on a highway, only at a garage.
    Friend of mine has a Rapido A class which does not have a spare wheel, I can only assume to increase load carried. He asked the question from some experts they said no problem, just fill tyres with anti puncture material which he did at a motorhome show for about £80. He was very lucky at Malvern where we were for 3 days to get the job done, the company doing this were very busy.
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