Celiac problems

Discussion in 'Funsters on a diet' started by Portland, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. Portland

    Portland Funster

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    I am new to this problem and find getting clear information on food is like platting fog! Do other Funsters have this problem and could you offer any advise . Already registered with the Celiac's (n)
     
  2. Debs

    Debs Funster

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    Hi my daughter was diagnosed with coeliac disease aged 9 - she's 24 now, also has type 1 diabetes which she was diagnosed with age 3.

    A couple of other conditions too, mostly connected to the immune system.

    What sort of things are you having problems with?
     
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  3. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    Basic start but you will know this already.

    Gluten is a protein found in three types of cereal:
    wheat
    barley
    rye
    Gluten is found in any food that contains the above cereals, including:
    pasta
    cakes
    breakfast cereals
    most types of bread
    certain types of sauces
    some types of ready meals
    In addition, most beers are made from barley.
     
  4. tinks703

    tinks703 Funster

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    Hi, I was confirmed celiac 4 years ago and aged 67 it was hard to take, however now it is not a problem. Look at all food labels any mention of gluten ditch it. At the supermarket go to the free from part of the store. There you will see an ever increasing range of gluten free products, some are good others uck! Bread is the most difficult! See if you like any of them there is now a wide choice.
    I found by accident a farmers market baker who made gluten free bread. You always have to ask about gluten in particular if you are eating out.
    See if can eat cakes etc from spelt flour, every thing we bake now is made from it. All members of my family try to buy gluten free products, not always possible. Fruit veg meats are all gluten free unless are mixed with a sauce or product.
    Good luck there are quite a few celiacs out there. If you want any info just ask.
     
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  5. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    Spelt is wheat. Lower in gluten than modern wheat but it is NOT gluten free. If you are truly coeliac you will react to spelt, you might not notice but the villi in your gut will flatten and you will be producing antibodies.

    I was diagnosed over 50 years ago so have a bit of an insight.

    EDIT: From wiki

    Spelt contains about 57.9 percent carbohydrates (excluding 9.2 percent fibre), 17.0 percent protein and 3.0 percent fat, as well as dietary minerals and vitamins.[9] As it contains a moderate amount of gluten, it is suitable for some baking. However, because spelt contains gluten it is not suitable for people with coeliac disease.[10] In comparison to hard red winter wheat, spelt has a more soluble protein matrix characterized by a higher gliadin:glutenin ratio.[11][12]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
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  6. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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  7. Cat53

    Cat53 Funster

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    Best thing I can advise is to cook from scratch for a while. Use cornflour to thicken gravy etc and avoid any bread....I say this in the full knowledge that gluten free bread is disgusting whilst your tastebuds and mind remember the smell, taste and texture of real bread.....after a couple of years try the various brands of gluten free bread. Just remember how much better you feel without gluten...you will probably lose some weight too. Gluten free muffins are really nice. You can make delicious cakes using ground almonds instead of wheat. Look on line, experiment, have fun, before too long it will become a natural way of life.
     
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  8. Hollyberry

    Hollyberry Funster

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    Can you still get a supply of basics--bread, pasta, via NHS ? I was tested for Coeliac just before I moved abroad and remember GP telling me about this basic monthly supply.

    I was more gluten intolerant and 3 years strictly no gluten seemed to repair me --but that won't work if you've the Coeliac anti body.

    I managed to eat gluten free in Cyprus and France ( and I'm also vegetarian) but found there was no such thing as a quick meal and it was impossible to buy a snack out.
    Once you get used to it, it's not too bad at all, and it helps to concentrate on what you CAN enjoy.
     
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  9. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    Yes, you can still get basics on prescription but they are the cheaper end of the market and some of the items are codex rather than fully gluten free.

    Codex means that there is less than so many parts per million (it's changed since I last checked) of gluten is allowed and for most will have minimum or no ill effects. For super-sensitives it will affect them and these few people will avoid codex food.
     
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  10. Hollyberry

    Hollyberry Funster

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    Just a thought---some kitchen equipment that might help--Nutri bullet? You can mix veg and fruit ( and chuck in nuts etc..) so you get the fibre and also helps you feel full. I've also got the frozen dessert maker by same company. Frozen fruit, berries, coconut milk or cream or yoghurt and you get a cross between frozen yoghurt and ice cream.
    You can bake your own gluten free bread but to be honest I found it just as awful as the bought stuff!
     
  11. sedge

    sedge Funster

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    You can make savoury stuff with ground almonds instead of flour too.

    We love cheese muffins, just finished the New Year batch, so easy and so many variations!
     
  12. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    Gluten free baking is certainly a challenge but it can be done. I have made bread that the birds won't touch and would sink a seagull but I have also had successes. The recipe on the back of the Dove's Farm bread flour is pretty good - I add seeds and so on for a bit more flavour.

    The Darina Allen (Allan?) book is the one I use most.
     
  13. Debs

    Debs Funster

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    For years I've used the Juvela white mix to make bread rolls.
    We had a family party where there were 3 other coeliacs and they couldn't believe it was gf. I just use it as I would flour - tbh I really don't think you can tell the difference with yorkshire puddings. I just make the whole batch with Juvela mix. 4oz, 4eggs, 4fl oz milk(y). We also use cornflour for thickening sauces.

    For the last few mths My daughter has been having warburtons gf baguettes on prescription, these are different to the 'sub' type rolls sold in the shops and she says they are really nice. I can get you the pip code if you want or if you look on the coeliac society website I guess they'll be on there under the prescribable items.

    The juvela mix is also on prescription.

    She likes the Dove Farm & Heinz dried gf pasta from the supermarket. Also the Warburtons wraps but at £3 for a pack of 3 against £1/pk for non gluten free she only has them occasionally.

    You should be sent the Crossed Grain mag - that's usually helpful.

    When my daughter was diagnosed we were lucky as she was changing her prescription a lot while she was trying different things and the gp was supportive.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  14. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    A lot of the food companies will send you free samples on request as well.
     
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  15. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    Also be aware that Juvela is codex rather than really gluten free**. It can claim to be gluten free as it has less gluten than 20 ppm. It also contains wheat so is not suitable for anyone who is wheat sensitive rather than gluten intolerant / coeliac.
    You might like to have a quick search on codex alimentarius* for some interesting discussions.
    It's a mine field out there when goods that contain some gluten can still be called gluten free.
    **many prescription items are codex rather than gluten free. Makes no odds for most people but a few are super sensitive and react very badly.
    * in the past the Australian regulations have been much tougher. Lots of coeliacs in Australia because of the Irish / Scots settlers.
     
  16. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    A student once asked my professor how they could tell if something was gluten free. He said "get Mrs P to eat it - she is more sensitive than any lab test" Unfortunately he was correct.
     
  17. Debs

    Debs Funster

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    It's hardly surprising people get confused is it Mrs P?:(
    But at least there is more awareness of it these days.
     
  18. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    When I was diagnosed in the 50s the bread came in tins and if it wasn't already green when you opened the tin it was by the end of the day.

    I've found I have become more sensitive with age and will react to just a couple of bread crumbs now - blisters on the mucosa and several days in the small room.
     
  19. Debs

    Debs Funster

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    I have seen the tinned bread, a friend of Les's used to have it - that would have been early '80's.
    I suppose we should be grateful it's relatively easy in comparison these days.
    No fun when you've had a reaction though:(
     
  20. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    No comfort for people coming to terms with a diagnosis but it is so much easier now.
    After the tins is was vacuum packed "bricks". Actually I think they are still around.
     

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