Carrying a bike in the garage?

Discussion in 'Motorcycles and Motorhomes' started by mustaphapint, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. mustaphapint

    mustaphapint Funster

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    We bought our MH with the intention of carrying one of our bikes in the garage (no - not the Harley). I know that my 350 Enfield will physically fit in but is probably a bit heavy, so I'm thinking of something like a Suzuki Van Van which is about 110Kg.
    Just wondering if anyone else keeps a bike in the garage and if there are any ramp type accessories that make loading and unloading a bit easier.
    I would much prefer to have everything under cover and not have to worry about so much about trailers or leaving a bike on show on a rack.
     
  2. mick noe

    mick noe Funster

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    we do carry honda 125 scooter in the garage. Fold up ramp ( ebay) to aid loading makes the job easier.
    Just watch the obvious overloading of the rear axle . I loaded bags of sand to the approx weight in the garage and weighed both axles before buying the scooter. I wish I could take my Harley this way but alas too heavy but find the scooter more than adequate and good fun.
     
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  3. mustaphapint

    mustaphapint Funster

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    Just found this. Very neat but not really practical in a motorhome garage and very expensive. I guess it's going to be a folding ramp and both of us man handling it.
     
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  4. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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  5. mustaphapint

    mustaphapint Funster

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    Thanks. I do have a folding ramp similar to this. I imagine the awkward bit is manoeuvring the bike through the opening which is only just wide enough and high enough for the bike, unlike a van or trailer where you can walk in alongside it.
     
  6. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    Yeah 650cc Kawasaki Versys 215kgs.
    Just run it up a ali ramp front wheel goes into a wheel catcher then a ratchet strap on each handlebar.
    Five minutes start to finish.
     
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  7. Stealaway

    Stealaway Funster

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    I would recommend the 250 - the 125 is a bit under powered.
    The 250 weighs 123 Kg not a lot more than the 125.
     
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  8. StanandShirley

    StanandShirley Funster

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    Like pappajohn have ramp and wheel clamp in garage. Changed from 125 to 250 weight with all loaded including full water tank still within weight limit. Only takes a few minutes load, sercured with tension straps it never moves.
     
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  9. awg

    awg Funster

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    I found a 300cc Vespa fitted height wise into mine so that's what I went for. Like others, I use a folding ramp from eBay and power the scooter up into the garage, I use R&G bar straps (to keep straps away from the paintwork) and ratchet straps to rails on the garage floor. I also use straps at the back from the grabrail to teh garage roof just in case a front rachet strap lets go. Not really needed but better safe than sorry.

    My wife feels safer with a topbox fitted so that is removed along with the mirrors before loading and the topbox can be refitted inside the garage to avoid it getting scratched in transit. Removing the mirrors/topbox, loading and refitting topbox is easily done in under 10 mins.
     
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  10. peterc10

    peterc10 Funster

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    Do you strap the wheel to the chock? Do you hold the back wheel in some way? Also do you put a strap around back as well?

    Sorry for the questions but we are looking at using a Honda scooter.
     
  11. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    Hi
    No I just connect a ratchet to each handlebar and tighten that's it no ties anywhere else no need we've travelled over 40000 miles carrying it that way and its never moved once. My van has some ali runners on each side of the garage for tieing down so just slotted in an eye on each side and connect the ratchet straps to those,
    Keep it simple is my moto, some folks make it far too complicated.:xThumb:
     
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  12. peterc10

    peterc10 Funster

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    Thanks. Have you bolted through the floor to hold the wheel chock? We have the ali runners and eye bolts so can use those. And there I was thinking that I needed a choc both ends. Is yours a heavy bike? The one I am after is a little lightweight scooter, its only 102kg, and I wonder if that would make a difference. Maybe a couple of ratchet straps on the back if I am really worried.
     
  13. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    Yes bolted through floor with plate underneath to spread load.
    This bike is 215kgs but the last one was 150kgs carried exactly the same for probably 12000 miles.
    Strap across the rear doesnt hurt if it gives you peace of mind I suppose I'm just used to it after all this time.:xsmile:
     
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  14. Serendipitous

    Serendipitous Funster

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    Fiamma carry moto ramps are pretty good not cheap but depends what your looking for and what sort of garage floor/door sills you have.

    Bought through johns cross gets you a discount.
     
  15. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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  16. nobby &noo

    nobby &noo Funster

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    straight up folding ramp two straps one on each side i don't strap downwards as its not good for fork seals
     

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  17. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    ?????????????????
    Can you explain that ?? ( unless the top of the sliders are rusty and pitted )
     
  18. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    Why?
    Been carrying bikes strapped this way on trucks, trailers and m/homes for 40 years and never had a problem with forks or any other elements. Plus 99% of all bikes transported are secured the same way.
     
  19. Scotties

    Scotties Funster Life Member

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    These talented off-roaders get get so much 'air' under them, working the forks at both extremes, so leaks are possible due to wear or seal damage.

    Shouldn't be a problem for you.

    Strap down (just firmly, don't want to pull the anchors out) the pressure on forks is probably less than you sitting on the bike.

    The van van is almost perfect, fuel injection (so allways starts), 100 mpg and tank range, big seat for two up, under 120kg so easy to load and move about. Not ideal for dual carriageways or big mountain passes, but with its 'sand wheels' ideal for local exploring, probably our favourite motorhome accessory.
     
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  20. bigtree

    bigtree Funster

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    This is my setup,front wheel catcher which is bolted onto a bit of alloy checker plate,this picks up 2 chassis bolts.At the back wheel I use a bit of 20mm ply to spread the load plus made a tapered ramp so that it rolls easy over the door lip.Then 4 ratchet straps to secure it.
     

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