Campsite Amps

Discussion in 'Continental Touring' started by ObiVanKenobi, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. ObiVanKenobi

    ObiVanKenobi Read Only Funster

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    Hello, we are just about to stay on a French campsite for the winter but we are unsure of how many Amps we need. Basically they offer everything from 2 - 10 amps, we hope to run the following:

    Fridge, LED internal lights, water pump etc but the main concern is our whale heater which has setting of 500, 1000 and 2000 W. So far I've managed to attain that the 2000W setting will take approx 8.7A but it would be good to be sure, hence the post?

    Additionally could anyone just confirm what the campsite Amps refers to, I.e is it 10A per day or 10A per start up of appliance etc?

    Any info appreciated, Thanks in advance
     
  2. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    You will need 10amp
     
  3. tonka

    tonka Funster Life Member

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    The amps are what you can "pull at 1 time"..... So you will need a 10amp supply if you want to use the heater.. You will have a continual 10amps.. Draw more than that ie heater and electric kettle on and the trip (if they have one) will go,...

    Check what they are charging for power.. You 2000 heater = 2kw... This is based on time..
    So heater on at 2000w = 2kw of power used... 2 hours = 4kw etc..

    You could run up a big bill if they have a high fee per KW and you overuse it...
     
  4. MikeD

    MikeD Funster

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    10 amps supply


    10 amps = the maximum amps at any one time. It may let you go over slightly whilst things start up but thats the maximum continuous load at any one time throughout the day.

    In my van when I first plug in the charger takes a lot of amps but this soon settles out to about 1/2 amp. With 10 amps I would set the heating on electric only - that would be another 4-5 amps. (But only when it is heating water and the van, not when everything is up to temp).

    The electric ring on the cooker is about 3 amps.

    Television/sat system is probably 2 amps

    They all add up to a max of ten for your hook up.

    So if you put the hair dryer on it would probably trigger the breaker and you will need to reset it.

    I think I have that right but if not someone with more knowledge will put me right. :thumb::thumb:
     
  5. ObiVanKenobi

    ObiVanKenobi Read Only Funster

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    That all sounds about right, I believe they don't charge for the usage eg KW per hour but I will certainly check.
    thanks for the replies, it's cleared up what I need/don't need

    Steve
     
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  6. canopus

    canopus Funster Life Member

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    Most modern continuously rated electricity supplies usually take account of 'diversity factor'. The assumption is that you won't have all your electric appliances on at the same time hence you won't overload the sappily 10 Amps in this case. However, on occasions you may have the heating on, switch the kettle on and unbeknowns to you, the fridge thermostat kicks in and bingo you pop the MCB. The clue is moderate what you use if possible :thumb:
     
  7. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

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    An ammeter might be a useful thing to have fitted. There is one in our van to say what the solar panel is doing but nothing to show what current the van is drawing when plugged in.
    They used to be common in cars but not any more.
     

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