Biological liquid v Toilet Chemicals

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by steveclecy, Mar 27, 2013.

  1. steveclecy

    steveclecy Read Only Funster

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    Got back yesterday from a rather cold but exhilarating week in Barmouth. Missed the snow but not the beastly Easterly! Still we were warm and cosy in our MH!

    This thread inspired me to try alternatives to the formaldehyde based toilet chemicals so I bought a £1.60 litre bottle of ASDA biological washing liquid and used two capfuls each day in the Thetford. My wife, Chris, has a nose like a Customs spaniel and would soon tell me if she detected bad odours.

    It has to be said we use the on-board for wee only other than in emergencies so perhaps the test was not as rigorous as it may be, however with daily emptying (and light enough to carry) I would have no hesitation in continuing using biological liquid.

    Perhaps because of regular emptying and rinsing or perhaps because of the biological action, the inside of the container is looking a lot cleaner. Also that sweet sickly smell of the chemical is no longer present.

    Steve
     
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  2. camocam1

    camocam1 Read Only Funster

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    when we bought our van we were surprise surprise told that we MUST use the "chemical" we did for a while but after reading various threads I tried Tesco's everyday Biological and works perfectly well (use it for both) Was actually away one weekend and forgot to load up with anything for the Loo but not problems with nothing in the Loo. have to say that I do empty the cassette every day. So next question is can I stop using the thetford toilet roll and use teco's own ???
     
  3. steveclecy

    steveclecy Read Only Funster

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    I have never used anything but standard (but nice and soft) toilet roll. It is designed to break down when left wet. Unlike "wet strength" tissues.

    Steve
     
  4. Carol

    Carol Funster Life Member

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    We have been useing the bio quite happily for past 12 months,with no problems.
     
  5. Ed Excel

    Ed Excel Funster

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    Once again

    I can only repeat the CC request that you don't use materials that would damage their systems. Bacteria don't like bio. ???
     
  6. Stewart J

    Stewart J Funster

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    Bio convert for 18 months and Andrex bog roll :thumb::thumb::thumb:
     
  7. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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    I am no chemist but how can bio be anymore harmful to bacteria than formaldehyde aren't both toxic
     
  8. Chockswahay

    Chockswahay Funster

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    Many rural public toilet will have private sewage systems - concerns regarding the use of dry powder biological powder:


    "Often dry powder clothes washer soap appears as clots and clogs in the system.
    Passing solid clumps of detergent into the septic tank speed clogging of the system and in severe cases can even block a building drain.

    "Budget" powdered laundry detergents contain extra amounts of fillers (in some cases montmorillonite clay) which increase the risk of system drainage or drainfield clogging.

    Surfactants in detergents (and from any source) are toxic to fish, basically suffocating them by interfering with the ability of the fish's gills to absorb oxygen from water.
    Phosphates in detergents pass through the septic system (or municipal wastewater treatment system) and enter surface water causing very high growth rates of algae. The algae growth, in turn, suffocates fish and other life in rivers, streams, lakes, and ponds. The rapidly growing "dead zones" at the edges of major water bodies around coastal areas are blamed on surface runoff that contains phosphates, (probably largely from agricultural use)."
     
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  9. maxsdad

    maxsdad Funster

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    Thats what i thought and you don't get blue stains on your fingers.
    Seem to think it was the green stuff that the caravan club did'nt like said it rotted plastic pipes or something:Eeek:
     
  10. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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    And once again I bow to the power of this group someone will always have a comment I actually understand some of what been said

    So what does formaldehyde do to the environment and what is a safe alternative
     
  11. Chockswahay

    Chockswahay Funster

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  12. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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  13. Chockswahay

    Chockswahay Funster

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    Ah.........still working on that one :Wink:
     
  14. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    At the risk of trotting out the well-worn response once more, get a SOG and don't use chemicals, washing liquid or, indeed, anything other than a bit of water. Oh, and use standard bog-roll too.
    If you don't know about SOG, search on here and / or have a look at this:
    http://www.soguk.co.uk/
     
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  15. Ed Excel

    Ed Excel Funster

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    From an Environmental Science publication; hope this helps:

    Most of the "biological" washing powders tend to have three things in common. The first is that they are pH balanced -- have lower political levels and are not quite as caustic as many of the stronger commercial compounds. The second thing is that they often have biological enzymes which are designed to be natural substances that help break down grease so that it can be washed off the dishes. A third thing is the fact that they will often have much lower phosphorus levels or will substitute phosphorus for silicates. The reason for this is that a little phosphorus goes along way -- and you can see from biological ratios that 1 pound of phosphorus will require 20 pounds of nitrogen and over 100 pounds of carbon in order to absorb it into a mass of biological cells. If you don't have the 100 pounds of biological cells -- and most septic tanks probably have a few tens of pounds of cellular material in them -- the balance of the phosphorus is washed through and exits the septic tank and goes into the leaching field. From the leaching field of phosphorus may or may not be absorbed in the soil and it may wind up contaminating groundwater.
     
  16. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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    There is no risk from me I am learning as I suspect are a few others
     
  17. Ridgeway

    Ridgeway Funster

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    Went bio last year after reading on here, honestly we found that the cassette smells a lot during warm days when we are traveling, no worse than nasty chemicals but still pretty dam smelly.

    Day off tomorrow:

    Job 1: prepare Ice cream van for this season

    Job 2: install SOG

    38mm hole saw at the ready:Eeek:
     
  18. cmcardle75

    cmcardle75 Read Only Funster

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    I'm not sure how much it saves over a dedicated biological toilet chemical. I used to use

    http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/blue-diamond-when-nature-calls-toilet-fluid-p148977

    until I got a van with a marine toilet that doesn't require chemicals at all. It seemed to work well enough. You probably want to empty at least every three days.
     
  19. Chockswahay

    Chockswahay Funster

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  20. AndyPandy

    AndyPandy Read Only Funster

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    Another vote for SOG bog :BigGrin:

    Anything which stops you messing about with chemicals has to be a winner, and believe me, it just works!

    Go on, you know it makes sense

    Andy
     
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