B2b charging

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Bart, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    I've got 3 x 130 ah batteries comined with a 60amp sterling b2b charger , also in stalled is a 1500w pure sine wave inverter.
    Currently we are at home and the mh was on ehu charging the batteries for about 12 hrs with the control panel at the start showing the batteries at about 80% and about 10amps going in via the on board charger . Anyway about 12hrs later the panel showed batteries 100% and zero amps going in or out . So I turned off the ehu.
    So later on I had to start the Mh and that's when I noticed that the sterling b2b charger the solid blue light on it - meaning fast charge mode / max charge and when I checked with a multimeter there was 40 amps going into the battery so I left it running . Then after a while I rechecked and the lights had changed to blue / yellow ( stage 2 absorption mode ) and it was still putting 35 -40 amps out of the b2b charger into the battery bank.
    Atm it is still pumping them amps out while I am typing this .
    My question is why is the b2b charger still pumping around 40 amps into the battery bank . When the built in charger stopped charging like a few hrs ago...
    And where is that 35 -40 amps going if the batteries are full
     
  2. flatpackchicken

    flatpackchicken Funster Life Member

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    Hmm interesting !!!!!!!! Look forward to the techno boys replys :).
     
  3. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    Input has now dropped down to 18amps , I'm thinking that the b2b charger just does a way better job of charging the batteries than the standard charger.
     
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  4. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    It does!

    Most on board chargers limit the voltage to prevent gassing. As a result, the batteries never fully charge and become sulphated.

    That is why you keep getting 'which new leisure battery' threads on here.
     
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  5. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    1hr later with the b2b running and it's still pumping betweem 20 to 30amps into the batteries.
    No strange smells or any heat from batteries / charger.

    Edit now just ramped up to 45amps
     
  6. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    The Sargent in ours cuts off and reads full charge at 13.4v.. Not even gassing voltage..

    Really must look at getting a decent charger in there sometime.
     
  7. peterc10

    peterc10 Funster

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    Depends what charger you have. The Electrobloc on our Hymer (and the one on our previous Adria) gives a full charge.
     
  8. Peter A Forbes

    Peter A Forbes Funster

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    You need to understand that batteries gas when they are fully charged so yes, there is an upper limit at which you can hold a battery on continuous float charge, around 13.80V or thereabouts, slightly more for sealed types. If the battery is at the fully charged level, there isn't much point at pushing more charge in as the battery cannot take it and the excess charge goes into gassing (breaking down of the water part of the electrolyte into Oxygen and Hydrogen) and heating of the battery.

    A battery on cyclic charge rate can be taken to a higher voltage but for a limited amount of time, you cannot run a battery on cyclic charge for extended periods.

    Batteries become sulphated through over-discharge and being left in a discharged state, a battery at 13.80 volts is never going to sulphate.

    Peter
     
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  9. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    That's what they tell you! I bet it doesn't!
     
  10. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    Yes it will.

    Repeated charging without completing a proper absorption phase will kill lead acid batteries.

    Trust me, I work for the 3rd biggest warehousing equipment. The number one reason for rejection of battery warranty claims is due to incomplete charging cycles by a user.
    All easily detected with charger download data.
     
  11. peterc10

    peterc10 Funster

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    Well the gauges (one Schaudt and one victron) say otherwise - holds a higher charge for a certain time, depending upon what type of battery you have programmed it for. I believe you call that an absorption phase. And then reverts to a float charge. Does it for both EHU and solar charging.

    But hey ... if you know more about Electroblocs than Schaudt ........
     
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  12. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    Hi what is a "proper absorption phase" ?
    is that using the battery until its 50% used ?

    Thanks
     
  13. peterc10

    peterc10 Funster

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    No, just the opposite. It is part of a defined charging regime to bring the batteries up to full charge. It depends what type of battery you have as to what that regime should be AFAIK
     
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  14. Techno

    Techno Funster Life Member

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    Did you perform the complicated task of setting the correct battery type on your B2B I'm assuming you bought the solid state unit? the red box.
    Mine has to put in 16amps for the fridge alone. Was your fridge on
     
  15. PhilandMena

    PhilandMena Funster

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    3 Stage Chargers.
    What are the 3 Stages of Smart Chargers?
    [​IMG]

    You may have heard it said "you need a 3 stage charger". We've said it, and we'll say it again. The best kind of charger to use on your battery is a 3 stage charger. They are also called "smart chargers" or "micro processor controlled chargers". Basically, these types of chargers are safe, easy to use, and will not overcharge your battery. Almost all of the chargers we sell are 3 stage chargers.

    Okay, so it's hard to deny that 3 stage chargers work and they work well. But here's the million dollar question: What are the 3 stages? What makes these chargers so different and efficient? Is it really worth it? Lets find out by going through each stage, one by one.

    Stage 1 | Bulk Charge
    [​IMG]The primary purpose of a battery charger is to recharge a battery. This first stage is typically where the highest voltage and amperage the charger is rated for will actually be used. The level of charge that can be applied without overheating the battery is known as the battery's natural absorption rate. For a typical 12 volt AGM battery, the charging voltage going into a battery will reach 14.6-14.8 volts, while flooded batteries can be even higher. For the gel battery, the voltage should be no more than 14.2-14.3 volts. If the charger is a 10 amp charger, and if the battery resistance allows for it, the charger will put out a full 10 amps. This stage will recharge batteries that are severely drained. There is no risk of overcharging in this stage because the battery hasn't even reached full yet.



    Stage 2 | Absorption Charge
    [​IMG]Smart chargers will detect voltage and resistance from the battery prior to charging. After reading the battery the charger determines which stage to properly charge at. Once the battery has reached 80%* state of charge, the charger will enter the absorption stage. At this point most chargers will maintain a steady voltage, while the amperage declines. The lower current going into the battery safely brings up the charge on the battery without overheating it.

    This stage takes more time. For instance, the last remaining 20% of the battery takes much longer when compared to the first 20% during the bulk stage. The current continuously declines until the battery almost reaches full capacity.

    *Actual state of charge Absorption Stage will enter will vary from charger to charger

    Stage 3 | Float Charge
    [​IMG]Some chargers enter float mode as early as 85% state of charge but others begin closer to 95%. Either way, the float stage brings the battery all the way through and maintains the 100% state of charge. The voltage will taper down and maintain at a steady 13.2-13.4 volts, which is the maximum voltage a 12 volt battery can hold. The current will also decrease to a point where it's considered a trickle. That's where the term "trickle charger" comes from. It's essentially the float stage where there is charge going into the battery at all times, but only at a safe rate to ensure a full state of charge and nothing more. Most smart chargers do not turn off at this point, yet it is completely safe to leave a battery in float mode for months to even years at a time.



    It's the healthiest thing for a battery to be at 100% state of charge.


    We've said it before and we'll say it again. The best kind of charger to use on a battery is a 3 stage smart charger. They are easy to use and worry free. You don't ever have to worry about leaving the charger on the battery for too long. In fact, it's best if you DO leave it on. When a battery is not at a fully charged state, sulfate crystal build on the plates and this robs you of power. If you leave your powersports in the shed during off-season or for vacations, please connect the battery to a 3 stage charger. This will ensure that your battery will be ready to start whenever you are.

    - See more at: https://www.batterystuff.com/blog/3-stages-of-smart-chargers.html#sthash.DNACnmkp.dpuf
     
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  16. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    Andy as far as im aware the factory setting for sealed 14.4v was correct for my batteries

    and nope no fridge or anything on, just the usual 0.20A being drawn according to the control panel ( i cannot find out what is drawing this power, but i suspect the reversing camera ,as i read people installed an isolation switch on some of theirs )
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
  17. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    Also will my batteries require topped up at some stage down the line , or are they sealed / maintenance free forever ?
     
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  18. Techno

    Techno Funster Life Member

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    Yes they're not banners. No topping up
     
  19. Bart

    Bart Funster

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    Just to check Andy isnt the default setting correct on my B2B charger for the batteries that i have atm ?
     
  20. Techno

    Techno Funster Life Member

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    I don't have the instructions to hand. If you've read them you're better informed than me (y)
     
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