a question for tag axle owners, or vosa/police officers

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by sadlonelygit, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. sadlonelygit

    sadlonelygit Read Only Funster

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    Does each rear axle have it's own weight limit or is it a combined limit?
    And anyone know what the unladen weight of tag axle van is?
    Be gentle with me as it's my first thread!
     
  2. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    Yes each axle has its own weight limit.
    Unladen weight depends on the van and loads of factors and the only way to be sure is put it on a weighbridge, nobody can tell you the weight of your van.
    For info mine is 3470kgs gross 5000kgs so payload 1530kgs.
     
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  3. Mr Colpot

    Mr Colpot Funster

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    If you look at the Weight Plate it should show limits for each axle individually as well as the Gross (Maximum) Vehicle Weight and Train Weight (Train Weight minus Gross weight = maximum weight of trailer/car that can be towed)
     
  4. martin2603

    martin2603 Funster

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    I have an tag axle Kontiki 4150kg 850kg payload max train weight 6000kg

    If you google the model you are interested in for spec and weights all info will be there.

    brgds Martin:RollEyes:
     
  5. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

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    From past experience, the manufacturers stated payload is usually optimistic to some extent, often by a considerable amount, so I wouldn't put any faith in that. The only way is to weigh it, and if you have a tag axle you will need to weigh each axle. The maximum permitted weights will be on the plate.
     
  6. Soaringman

    Soaringman Funster

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    From a relative newbie, we bought our van because of its layout. We were totally naive when it came to payload. I think we were very lucky to have chosen a van with a tag axle. It seems by other peoples post that the payload for most single axle vans is quite low.
    So if you want to carry a lot of stuff with you it would pay to get a tag:thumb:
     
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  7. maz

    maz Funster

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    My plate gives a separate figure for each of the rear axles but when I took the van to a weighbridge they couldn't weigh each of them separately 'cos the wheels are too close together. Weighed the entire van then just the front axle - the difference was assumed to be shared equally between the two rear axles. Has anyone managed to actually weigh each rear axle separately?
     
  8. Forestboy

    Forestboy Funster Life Member

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    No I just weigh the 2 rear axles together then front on its own and then the complete vehicle never been anywhere near overloaded even with my Kawasaki 650 in the garage. :thumb:
     
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  9. Daedalus

    Daedalus Funster

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    Twin (or Tag) axles each have their own maximum permitted weight limits, however, closely spaced axles (such as the axles on a 'tag') are classed as "compensating" axles, so as long as the sum of the weight of the two axles is not over the combined maximum permitted weight, there is not problem.

    e.g. Permitted max. weight = 2020 kilograms per axle - total permitted "compensating" axle weight = 4040 kilograms - So if the front of the pair is 2000 kilograms and the second is 2040 kilograms, the compensated weight is 4040 kilograms and is legal.

    Please be aware that although one of the axles may be a bit over the permitted weight for that axle and the other under the permitted weight for that axle, and, the total weight on or under the sum of the combined permitted weights, if the over weight axle is too much over the permitted weight, it may still be classed as overloaded by the authorities - it would also point to a problem in the compensating arrangement of the suspension if there was a large differential between the two axles.

    Clear as mud - I hope so.

    As has been said, the only way to be sure of your unladen weight (the actual unladen weight, not that quoted by the manufacturer / converter) is to weigh it with a full tank of fuel and a full water tank. This will then give you a figure to show what other things you can carry without being over-loaded.

    And yes, I know you can travel with empty water tanks, just remember that a litre of water weighs about 1 kilogram, as does a litre of diesel (not exactly, but close enough to give a reasonable estimate) - so that makes it easy to work out.

    Twin (or tag) axles should be weighed as one axle - unless you can find a dynamic weighing plate which operates in 'static' mode.

    Daedalus
     
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