16 Amp - what can I use?

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Roryboys Dad, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. Roryboys Dad

    Roryboys Dad Read Only Funster

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    Could anyone tell me how many MH items I could run whilst on EHU without overloading the system?

    If the hookup output was 16 Amp would I be alright on these very cold nights to have the Trumatic heater on with hot water mode, internal lights (about 12 Led lights) and Tv on without using too much power and tripping the system?

    The fridge/freezer will obviously be on, we may also want to use the electric oven and possibly the shower.

    Are the relatively essential items I've mentioned above likely to trip the leccy or would I have ample spare capacity?

    Some EHU points have only 10Amps – would they trip the lower amperage or would my usage still be ok?

    As a relative newcomer, we hired in previous years but now have our own MH, I'd just like to get some feedback from you more experienced Funsters.

    :france::france::france:
     
  2. maz

    maz Funster

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    It depends on the wattage of those items. :Smile:

    I don't know the wattage of your Trumatic elements but my Truma Combi is max 1.8kW. I run that 24/7 on 16A hook-up with fridge/freezer, LED lights, 65W computer (no TV) and 1kW kettle or toaster (not both together) with no problems. Shower will only need water pump extra and that's 12v. Electric oven could well cause a problem with overload tho' - what wattage is it?
     
  3. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    Watts = Volts x Amps

    So you can run up to 230 x 16 = 3,680 watts (3.68 kilowatts).

    Add up the wattage of the items you wish to use concurrently and make sure you do not exceed the limit above.

    For a 10 amp supply the answer is 230 x 10 = 2,300 watts.

    Don't forget to include the wattage of the charger, but assume that you can ignore 12V items running directly from the battery(ies) - e.g. LED lights and possibly the TV (unless it is plugged into a 230V socket).
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  4. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    A very useful investment is a mains power monitor.. as sold by most DIY stores..

    I had an Owl .. and it shows what power you are using.. it can also be set to alarm at a pre set figure .. so you not only know what you are using but get an alarm before the MCB trips.. I had mine set at 3.5kw when on a 16A EHU


    Simple to install.. not wiring required.. battery operated, the transmitter clips over either the brown or blue incoming supply wire in your Dis Box.

    about £30.. depending on where you buy

    http://www.johnlewis.com/owl-tse009-001-micro-electricity-monitor/p231593710?s_pccid=pc_gs__&kpid=231593710
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  5. G8WVW

    G8WVW Read Only Funster

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    ... times 0.9 to allow for power factor.

    16A max 3.3kW
    10A max 2kW

    As mentioned, domestic type power monitor as supplied by Electric companies brilliant for keeping eye on usage. Clip the sensor around the brown wire from your hook-up socket :)
     
  6. Theonlysue

    Theonlysue Funster Life Member

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    16 amp

    hi, some campsites only have 6 amp !
    it maybe a case of switching items off to allow something else to work.
    your fridge will just switch in and out when it needs to.
    it may be a case of earnings you go along.

    we also camp just using leisure batteries and no hook up.
    and then it will probably just be what you really need.
    good luck:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  7. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    power factor would only come into the calculation if the load was inductive ..

    as most of the load in a motorhome will be resistive.. ie heating.. the current and voltage will change polarity in step, this does not affect power factor..

    the sensor for the power monitor can be clipped around either blue or brown ..(but not both) makes no difference..
     
  8. G8WVW

    G8WVW Read Only Funster

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    ... was trying to be general to an audience many of whom will not understand non-resistive/reactive loads. If just thinking of heating pf~ 1.0 however microwave ovens, vacuum cleaners and many other smaller appliances are reactive. 0.9 allows for any load within reason for normal users who cannot ascertain whether their load is purely resistive or not.
     
  9. Philcott

    Philcott Read Only Funster

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    :Eeek::cry:
     
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  10. maz

    maz Funster

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    Just two alpha males facing off. :Wink:

    You only need to worry if your load is radioactive! :BigGrin:
     
  11. canopus

    canopus Funster Life Member

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    Most domestic electricity supplies are reliant on what is known as 'diversity factor' which assumes you are unlikely to have all your heavily rated appliances on continuously and at the same time. Thus the chances of overloading the fuse rating is lessened. However, people can achieve overload situations due largely to having heaters, kettles and other high wattage appliances on together. The trick is to turn the heating down or off before you put the kettle on. Simples:thumb:
     
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  12. oldun

    oldun Read Only Funster

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    You can take as many kilowatts as you like - hundreds of them if you wish - what you cannot do is plug in and switch on too many of them. You must get use to unplugging/switching off those that are not needed at that time.

    Another point to consider is that the sockets in the MH are individully "fused", often at only 10 amps. This means that you can only have about 2.2 kw plugged in even if no other electricity is being used and 16A is available at the other end of the EHU lead.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  13. Parcverger

    Parcverger Funster - Campsite Owner

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    This sort of question was one of the reasons we went for 16A ehus throughout the site. Most of our guests have motorhomes or RVs, and these days require better than 6A or even 10A, especially during the winter when heating is necessary, or summer with air conditioning becoming more usual. Even caravanners can use plenty of power with heaters in awnings that are part of their living space even in winter
    Bob
    www.parcverger.com
     
  14. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    Thats a nice looking place you have, we have added that to our list to visit this year.

    John
     
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