110 Ah Leisure Battery

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by madbluemad, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    Can some body please tell me of what use is a 110 Ah Leisure Battery. If you use more than half of the 110 Ah the battery is U-S.

    You can scrap the thing, just by having a couple of lights on and watching the telly for a few hours.

    So: Whats the point ??. What do peeps do with their Leisure Battery.

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,471
    Likes Received:
    16,926
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    a bit confused Jim.

    like everything motorhome, you must use 12v power frugally off grid.

    2 x 10w halogens and a 15" TV will be around 5amps max.

    50/5=10hrs use...less a bit for pump, fridge 12v circuit board etc.

    if you discharge below 50% then recharge as soon as possible, you wont necessarily kill the battery but will shorten its life.

    do it repeatedly and you will seriously shorten it to a point of uselessness in a short time.

    once it is dead you could weigh it in for scrap......around £1 per kilo i think at the moment.
     
  3. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2010
    Messages:
    5,261
    Likes Received:
    7,881
    Location:
    West Norfolk
    We spent a week at Val Thorens in the French Alps. Temperatures ranged from -20 to -5 and we had our Webasto diesel blown-air heating and boiler on permanently, maintaining around 18 degrees C inside the van and water at 70 degrees C.
    We watched one or two DVDs each night and used lights and water as required.
    During all that time, we ran our engine for an hour and a quarter on the Thursday lunchtime to top up the batteries.
    We have 2x 115 Ah traction batteries in addition to the original 85 Ah Banner leisure battery. Open circuit voltage before we left was 11.7V, indicating a safe (for our batteries) 75% discharge.

    There are batteries and there are battery-shaped objects...............:Angry:
     
  4. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,706
    Likes Received:
    3,211
    Location:
    Eastbourne East Sussex
    Or better still fit LED lights. Our 15" tv running on 12v + a few LED lights around 2-3amps so your 50Ah usable capacity will give about 15hrs running.
    As far as possible always run your TV direct from 12v as running it on mains from an inverter is very inefficient.
     
  5. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,706
    Likes Received:
    3,211
    Location:
    Eastbourne East Sussex
    To answer the actual question what I do with my battery. I have 2 x 125Ah house batteries with 320W of solar. Don't watch a lot of TV though read a lot and the consumption of a Kindle is neglible.
    We do however run a hairdryer and toaster from the inverter which use a lot while they're on (around 100A each). In the winter the solar will only produce at best around 35-40Ah a day but up to 200Ah a day in summer.
    Reckon can easily go up to 5 days in Winter without EHU or running the engine, and indefinitely in the summer. In fact in the summer we use an electric kettle from the inverter to use up some of the surplus and save gas :BigGrin:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    So am I pappa. Tbh I was on a bit of a rant. I just don't see the point in Leisure Batteries. They don't really do all that much good for the price that they cost, although jonandshell seem to be doing ok.

    Just how they got that much usage from 230 Ah worth of battery is beyond me. I'm not sure what the 85 Ah battery would have done if it was connected into 2x115 Ah batteries. Thats not an efficient way of using batteries.

    Inverters just take twice the power out of the same amount of available battery power and they do it twice as fast.

    Solar, imo is a waste of money. The cost of installing solar far out-ways the cost benefits. You can never make your money back on solar. Imo its just not cost efficient.

    I just cant be bothered with looking after my Leisure battery to ensure that I get the optimum benefit from it. Call me lazy. (Go On) :Wink:
    Jim
    :thumb:
     
  7. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    Actually 200 Ah sounds good. I'd like to see your set up and cost it out etc etc.
    Jim
    :Smile:
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  8. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    The other thing to be continually looking out for are things that are switched on that you dont know about. For example, your gas alarm, your electric step, your micro wave and fridge freezer. If their not switched off at the plug, their using power.
    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  9. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2009
    Messages:
    10,141
    Likes Received:
    16,394
    Location:
    Liverpool.
    Ok here are some actual field trials for you.
    I have not had hookup for years and are now 3 months living in the van. I have 2 X 75 watt solar panels and 3 X 110 amp leisure batteries. I have a gismo that when the leisure batteries are full it diverts any solar power to charge the engine battery, so in effect the solars are charging 4 batteries. I have LED lights including the awning light which stays on for hours and sometimes all night if I forget to switch it off. I have a 12 volt 19" TV DVD player and a 12 volt satellite receiver. I charge my laptop and mobile phones with 12 volt and although I have a 500 watt inverter never use it. The inverter is only there as an emergency standby. My battery bank is normally full by 11 AM or at the latest noon. When on campsites I always decline the electric as I don't need it and am sure that the initial outlay has paid for itself many times over. Taking this into consideration even if it had not paid for itself in monetary terms it certainly has by not having to worry about using the battery power in case the batteries are flat.
    Oh and if anyone wants to buy a genny which has never been used in anger, I have one for sale :Wink:
     
    • Like Like x 4
  10. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    I think its just a case of me shifting myself and and putting in a bit of effort. Even so, my battery is wasted and has been for about 4 years but we still seem to get by without any bother.
    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  11. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,706
    Likes Received:
    3,211
    Location:
    Eastbourne East Sussex
    3 solar panels at £117 each, + 1 bought several years ago when they were expensive. 30A regulator £38, not really talking big money, solar is pretty cheap these days.
     
  12. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    So without being rude, how much did it cost to have them fitted and are they linked in to you batteries.
    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  13. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2010
    Messages:
    5,261
    Likes Received:
    7,881
    Location:
    West Norfolk
    Like I said, there are batteries that do what they say on the side and there are leisure batteries (now officially called 'battery-shaped objects' in this household!)

    The vast majority of leisure batteries are a waste of time and money if you wild camp a lot. They are usually re-labelled starter batteries with a bigger price tag.

    Buying traction batteries designed for golf buggies, sweeping machines, etc. costs more initially, but is worth the investment because you can discharge them deeper (up to 80%) safely and they will stand far more discharges before they expire.
    We use a Sterling Battery to Battery charger on our van which puts far more useable power into the batteries and prevents sulphation by charging at a higher voltage than your alternator alone will achieve.
    As for that 85 Ah leisure battery in parallel, 'so what?', don't believe the old wives tales on the forums about the larger batteries only receiving the charge of the smaller one. It's simply not true. That situation will only occur in cells/batteries linked in series, not parallel.

    I agree, it's not best practice to have unequal sized batteries, but until the 85Ah battery dies, why replace it? The specific gravities are all OK, so it'll stay put for now.

    I work as a forklift engineer, we certainly don't expect to get only 50% (325Ah) out of a 650Ah 48V battery, so why should us leisure users?:Angry:

    We should all rise against the industry, say b^*&%cks to their batteries and visit our local forklift battery man instead!:thumb:

    That's my rant over!:BigGrin:
     
    • Like Like x 4
  14. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    27,245
    Likes Received:
    34,474
    Location:
    Acklam, Teesside, originally Glossop
    You could say the same about the whole motorhome, Jim :Smile: but to me it isn't just about money.

    In our previous van we had about 3 years with an 85Ah battery and 2 years+ with a 110Ah battery. With our 50W free standing panel and (eventually) LED lights we were never in danger of running out of power.

    Two of the first things we did with the new van (which has an 85Ah battery) were to have an 80W rooftop solar panel installed and change the lights to LED. On our first triup without EHU a couple of weeks ago the panel replaced the power we used each day so we are now pretty sure that, as with the other van, we can spend as long as we like off EHU.

    That assurance, to me, provides the value that looking only at the cost does not.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  15. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    Yes Graham, I've had a change of mind after reading some of the posts in this thread.
    Jim
    :Smile:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,706
    Likes Received:
    3,211
    Location:
    Eastbourne East Sussex
    Rude or not, I can't really tell you as it was part of a bigger job, however if you don't mind working on your roof (I have no head for heights) its quite an easy DIY job. You need a waterproof thingy to take the wires through the roof and some Sikaflex and Bobs your uncle. Best ask someone like JJ who has fitted his own rather than me who hasn't.
    The wiring is simple, connect panel(s) to regulator, connect regulator to any battery in your bank, just make sure your wires are thick enough to carry the current without too much loss.
     
  17. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    I dont have a problem with heights but I went dizzy when I saw wires an regulators panels an battery banks an ........................ :shout:
    Jim
    :thumb:
     
  18. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2008
    Messages:
    5,706
    Likes Received:
    3,211
    Location:
    Eastbourne East Sussex
    No the wiring is very simple, from the panel there are two wires + - which connect to the regulator connections which are marked. Make sure you put a fuse in the + wire so you can disconnect the panel from the regulator. Two wires from the regulator go to the +- on the battery. Make sure however you connect the battery to the regulator before connecting the panel (just leave the fuse out till its all done).
    At a later time if you need to disconnect the battery, take out the fuse in the panel wiring before you do otherwise you can fry the regulator.

    Probably badly explained but it is very simple, and instructions are usually with the regulator.:thumb:
     
  19. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    27,245
    Likes Received:
    34,474
    Location:
    Acklam, Teesside, originally Glossop
    On reason we had or panel installed by Dave Newell was to make sure it was wired properly. Dave wired it into the Elektroblok, rather than direct to the battery, so I can read performance from the built in ammeter and voltmeters plus the starter battery receives a trickle charge, just a when on EHU:thumb::thumb:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. bandit

    bandit Funster

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    112
    Location:
    Widnes,Cheshire
    110.amp hr

    Mornin all,from sunny liverpool,when my motorhome went in for the new night heater,they also fitted a pair of 110 batteries,i av 90watt solar panel on roof andthat keeps the bats topped up.since i lived out in it for 5weeks,ive changed my lights to l.e.d and noticed the diferance,the battery meter hardly moves now,even when heaters on all night.in the long run i think it is worth spending a bit money,because we are goin to be using it alot this year.all best to everybody and enjoy the weekend.the bandit.:thumb::Blush::BigGrin:
     
    • Like Like x 1
Loading...

Share This Page